train

  1. KorbenDallas

    19th Century: Compressed Air Cars, Street Cars and Trains: gone and forgotten...

    For me it all started with this hard to explain streetcar setup, where a streetcar was being pulled by a horse. This is one of those instances where an official explanation was running into a sharp contradiction with common sense. I was always wondering why people would go through the hurdles of...
  2. KorbenDallas

    19th Century: Hyperloop Pneumatic and Atmospheric Subways and Railways

    Another proof that there were technologies far superior to the time when they were introduced is the pneumatic tube saga of the 19th century. What we know today as the Hyperloop was used in New York (Beach Pneumatic Transit) in 1867, in London (Crystal Palace pneumatic railway) in 1864 and in a...
  3. KorbenDallas

    1906 Earthquake: Train Derailed by a Quake

    Some of us have seen this photograph before. The train ended up on its side due to the famous 1906 earthquake. The one that destroyed SF. The 1907 account reads: At Point Reyes Station at the head of Tomales Bay the 5:15 train for San Francisco was just ready. The conductor had just swung...
  4. KorbenDallas

    Victorian Trains: Evidence Eradication Technique?

    From 1895 until the 1930s, staged train wrecks were a popular - albeit destructive - event at fairs and festivals across the U.S., long before anyone ever thought of wrecking old automobiles at a demolition derby or monster truck rally. For 40 Years, Crashing Trains Was One of America’s...
  5. KorbenDallas

    1932: Russian Steel Balls Train

    An electric train which travels on steel balls instead of wheels has been tested in Russia with remarkable success. The speedy train, which was designed by a young Soviet engineer named Yarmolshuk, resembles a giant reptile weaving about the countryside. The inventor declares his final design...
  6. KorbenDallas

    1886: Meigs Elevated Railway. 227 feet of BS.

    The Meigs Elevated Railway was an experimental steam-powered monorail invented by Josiah V. Meigs of Lowell, Massachusetts. He wrote an extensive explanation of how the railway worked, complete with diagrams and statistics, which was published in 1887. The weight of the train was carried on a 22...
  7. KorbenDallas

    1893: 100 MPH High Speed Electric Train

    This is definitely not something I have ever heard about before. How about a 100 MPH electric train in 1893. And what's interesting, it sounds like they actually started implementing this project by grading 24 miles of the proposed real estate. Logically, this fact is supposed to mean that they...
  8. KorbenDallas

    Funeral trains, flags, mummies or when did Lincoln really die?

    Enjoy the song first!!! what's the train number? Lincoln's Funeral 1. Weird flags on the Abraham Lincoln's Funeral Train 2. 1867, 37-star Flag flown during 1865 funeral 3. Suspicious Locomotives 4. WTF moment 1. Lincoln Funeral Train Flag Official Flag According to Smithonian, the above...
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