Tech

Technological achievements of the past that cannot be properly explained

19th century Fax Machine by Giovanni Caselli

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Once again, this is supposed to be common knowledge, for it is googlable, and can be found on Wikipedia, as well as on a whole bunch of other resources. Yet, I doubt that things similar to the ones presented below are being taught at school. If they are, they are probably being presented as some...

1597: World's oldest 421 y.o. eight shot revolver

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Every single article pertaining to this, allegedly, 1597 revolver contains nothing but speculations. The official story says that this gun was made by a certain gunsmith named Hans Stopler. Apparently a stamp mark of a horse spur, told the director of Maihaugen Folk Museum, Gaute Jacobsen, that...

1680 pocket watches by Thomas Tompion

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Thomas Tompion was an English clockmaker, watchmaker and mechanician who is still regarded to this day as the Father of English Clockmaking. Tompion's work includes some of the most historic and important clocks and watches in the world and can command very high prices whenever outstanding...

1662: 17 hour Tartarian Muscovy Clock

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Little by little, things reveal themselves, though without any specific explanation of what their meaning could be. Here we have a seventeen hour clock which apparently was installed on the Kremlin Spasskaya Tower as recently as 17th century. In this case, the kudos goes to a certain German...

1914: vision of Moscow in 22nd, and 23rd Centuries

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We are so used to the linear human development model, that any deviations from the said model sound very questionable, and unrealistic. Yet, we have various authors who operated within the genre known as surrealism, and fantasy fiction. Individuals like Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Edgar Rice...

The "Draughtsman-Writer" automaton by Henri Maillardet

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In November of 1928, a truck pulled up to The Franklin Institute science museum in Philadelphia and unloaded the pieces of an interesting, complex, but totally ruined brass machine. Donated by the estate of John Penn Brock, a wealthy Philadelphian, the machine was studied and the museum began to...

1932 Russian Steel Balls Train

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An electric train which travels on steel balls instead of wheels has been tested in Russia with remarkable success. The speedy train, which was designed by a young Soviet engineer named Yarmolshuk, resembles a giant reptile weaving about the countryside. The inventor declares his final design...

Gyro cars, trains and monowheels of the early 20th century

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Technology like the one presented in this little compilation article is not exactly hidden. As a matter of fact, the information is widely available, if you know what to look for. Early in the 20th century mechanical and engineering magazines were widely advertising these items. These gyroscopic...

100 year old ship "Kommuna" is still in service

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As a testament to the levels of quality equipment which was mass produced in the past, I wanted to present to you this Russian submarine salvage ship Kommuna. Christened Volkhov in 1912, it was renamed in 1922 and ever since has been known as Kommuna. On November 17th, 2013...

Year 1901: making, and handling 160 ton granite columns

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The lathe is 86 feet long, weighs 135 tons and swings 6 feet 6 inches by 60 feet long. Eight tools are used, each taking a 3-inch cut so that the column is reduced 2 feet each time the cutters traverse the entire length of the bed. The head and tall stocks are carried on extensions of the bed...

1868 boring machine, and some other equipment examples

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We have to be missing something somewhere. Honestly, I feel conned coming up on some of the technological advancements of the past. This time it is this 1868 boring machine. It is safe to assume that it was not invented in its final state pictured below. There had to be some development, and may...

Scythian gold craftsmanship, where did it come from?

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"The Scythians worked in a wide variety of materials such as gold, wood, leather, bone, bronze, iron, silver and electrum. The characteristic art was produced in a period from the 7th to 3rd centuries BC, after which the Scythians were gradually displaced from most of their territory by the...

Pre-1857 King's Boat in the Shape of a Fish. What kind of ship is this?

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She was a very unusual ship covered in fish-like scales possibly made of metal. Equipped with a rudder and displaying sliding doors, she allegedly belonged to the last Nawab of Awadh. It does not appear that this ship was designed to use oars, or sails. Two mermaid-like statues decorated her...

Year 1834 - Russian submarine rocket launch

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I am not quite sure what to make of this interesting piece of information, but apparently Russians managed to launch some rockets from a submerged submarine as far back as 1834. Looks like they hit their targets as well. No clue why somebody would conceive such an idea in 1834. Granted, the sub...

Ironclad ships - another example of Tartarian technology?

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In my opinion, most of the ironclads (if not all) have nothing to do with progressive development of our technology. In other words, they came from nowhere. Another way of saying this would be something like this: we operated these ships, but we did not build them. I do not know who built them...

Our civilization did not build Titanic, Olympic or Britannic. Theirs did. Was it the Tartarian one?

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Once again, tackling a well known topic, I risk to sound ridiculous but hold your judgement till you have some material objections to make. Jumping ahead I will say, that the issue of "we did not build this ship" extends way beyond these three ships. In reality, this is one of those instances...

Is there a Tesla car in space?

  • Yes

    Votes: 6 14.3%
  • No

    Votes: 36 85.7%

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