Tech

Technological achievements of the past that cannot be properly explained

Pre-1857 King's Boat in the Shape of a Fish. What kind of ship is this?

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She was a very unusual ship covered in fish-like scales possibly made of metal. Equipped with a rudder and displaying sliding doors, she allegedly belonged to the last Nawab of Awadh. It does not appear that this ship was designed to use oars, or sails. Two mermaid-like statues decorated her...

Year 1834 - Russian submarine rocket launch

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I am not quite sure what to make of this interesting piece of information, but apparently Russians managed to launch some rockets from a submerged submarine as far back as 1834. Looks like they hit their targets as well. No clue why somebody would conceive such an idea in 1834. Granted, the sub...

Ironclad ships - another example of Tartarian technology?

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In my opinion, most of the ironclads (if not all) have nothing to do with progressive development of our technology. In other words, they came from nowhere. Another way of saying this would be something like this: we operated these ships, but we did not build them. I do not know who built them...

Our civilization did not build Titanic, Olympic or Britannic. Theirs did. Was it the Tartarian one?

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Once again, tackling a well known topic, I risk to sound ridiculous but hold your judgement till you have some material objections to make. Jumping ahead I will say, that the issue of "we did not build this ship" extends way beyond these three ships. In reality, this is one of those instances...

Sedona, Utah: circular saw or a weird natural occurrence?

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There are a lot of bizarre rock formations in the Sedona area of Utah. A few days ago I took a couple of pictures of this strange cut on the side of this huge rock. What, in your opinion, could be the cause of this circular cut out looking thingy...

19th century compressed air cars and street cars: gone and forgotten

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This is actually some fun stuff folks. 150 years ago people could have been getting around by driving compressed air powered personal cars, and were boarding compressed air powered modes of public transportation. We are so duped into our internal combustion engines, that it is both sad and...

Flame-bladed swords. 15th Century Pro-Sports, and the Battle of Anghiari.

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The battle is well known for its depiction in a now-lost painting by Leonardo da Vinci. It is probably painted on the wall of the same room where NASA's lost Moon Landing Footage is being kept. Though "specialists" say that it might be hidden beneath later frescoes in the Hall of Five Hundred.

1900-1915 HD quality photos of the United States cities. Is that normal?

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I don't know about you, but this quality of the 1900-1915 photography does not quite match my perception, based on the dogmatic education I received. Below are some photos available on the Library of Congress website. The quality is beyond explainable IMHO. These photographs predominantly...

Drones: Unmanned Systems of World Wars I and II

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Drones, or any other unmanned vehicles are normal occurrence in today's life. Yet, I was surprised to find out that there were plenty of unmanned systems as early as 1915. I understand, that in part it demonstrates certain blank spots in my own education, and general knowledge. At the same time...

16th century rockets: manned, multistaged and nozzled?

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I don't know much about the 16th century rockets, but some things appear to be so out of place, that acceptance of their existence is very strange. The origins of the knowledge are not being questioned. Why? According to our traditional science, even...

Jedi Knights of the 17th century

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Bizarre things dug out from the literature of the past keep on coming. Whatever is depicted on the images below is beyond my understanding, when looked from the conventional stand point. Of course being in French, and German, understanding of these books does not help my comprehension of the...

The obscure high-tech Stone Age "they" do not want you to know about

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"The Stone Age was a time thousands of years ago, when humans lived in caves and jungles. Life was simple, and there were only two main things to do - to protect themselves from the wild animals and to gather food. It started almost with the evolution of mankind. For both purposes, people...

60,000 pieces, 240 years old. Jaquet-Droz's dolls still write, draw, and play music

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There had to be something in the water in the 18th century. A whole lot of people acquired some amazing skills out of, what seems, nowhere. Another one of these brilliant individuals was Pierre Jaquet-Droz. He was born on July 28, 1721, in La Chaux-de-Fonds, in Canton Neuchâtel, Switzerland. He...

Moving sidewalks at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris

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This is amazing how one thing leads to another. Looking into the so-called achievements of the 19th century, I keep on running into one too many of those "ahead of its time" inventions. This time it is moving sidewalks. These sidewalks I am about to present were powered by electricity (Le...

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