79 A.D. no more: Pompeii got buried in 1631

anotherlayer

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#21
As far as the topic at hand goes; the existence of the aqueduct (built in 1592) alone puts this 79 AD nonsense to rest.
ok, can you just succinctly elaborate in the fewest words possible? before i put this nonsense to rest, i want it to be clear. then we can notify the Russians.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#22
The aqueduct was built in 1592 through the buried in 79 AD city of Pompeii. The aqueduct was built with water access points - water wells, as can be seen in OP photos. Why would an engineer build water wells access points, some with swing doors, deep below the ground level?

I hope that was the answer to your question.
 
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KorbenDallas

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#24
Very interesting set of etchings indeed. Done by Luigi Rossini (1790–1857). They could be done by him in my opinion. Only I think his date of birth/death are seriously altered. Should probably be moved backwards to like 1600s, just like Piranesi's. Based on the actual etchings probably a bit after Piranesi. Rossini's streets went through some street cleaning activities, but still have plenty of vegetation on the buildings.

That is if he ever existed to start with. Some of those Piranesi, and this Rossini's works look like altered photography, or computer graphics.

Tools of altering our history follow (in my opinion):
  • Wiki says "he was an Italian artist, best known for his etchings of ancient Roman architecture. Like his predecessor Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Rossini focused on extant antique Roman architecture and excavations in Rome and its environs, and rendered in exquisite detail classical architecture of Rome and its surrounding countryside. His images of the architectural masterpieces of ancient Rome, including the Pantheon, the Coliseum, the Appian Way, the Temple of Peace, and the Golden House of Nero, have greatly influenced architects, artists, writers, and other connoisseurs of Roman culture up to the present day. His first series of views was published in 1814. He began his Roman antiquities series in 1819, completing 101 large folio plates which were published in Rome in 1825."
* * * * *​
Essentially what they do, they turn stuff inside out, and spin it backwards. They make it official that Rossini has never seen any of the objects in the state he drew them in. They also justify/legalize all the "future" Romanesque style buildings. And they provide an explanation for multiple other authors whose observation the official narrative was going to discredit.

pompeii_1.jpg

Returning to the Pompeii issue. It appears that Rossini had a chance to observe Pompeii in the state he depicted it. If he really died in 1857, than that is what the Pompeii looked like not long before his death. In this case, of course, somebody would have some explaining to do, for these images do raise a few intricate questions.
 

Timeshifter

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#25
I don't have much to add to his excellent thread, except I have seen stumbled across this latest bit of misinformation. I cannot fathom how they expect intelligent minds to buy the official narrative of Pompeii.

Horses?
 
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#26
Korben, I do fully agree with the 1631 date for the burrying of Pompei (I have also written on the subject). A remark on Piranesi. I have an edition with all the engravings of Piranesi. This ones are not there. Perhaps not all engravings of the Piranesi workshop are contained in my edition, but I have looked many times at them and I can recognize his style faultlessly. And therefore I am pretty sure that the engravings under your chapter "Piranesi and Pompeii" are not the work of Piranesi. Also, Piranesi had another view, he still knew about the magnificence of the Ancient World. The etchings you published contain the view of typical historians, are first half of 19t century I think, and of different origin (the first two have captions in Italian, the others in French). This resolves your problem that Piranesi knew too much.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#28
Korben, I do fully agree with the 1631 date for the burrying of Pompei (I have also written on the subject). A remark on Piranesi. I have an edition with all the engravings of Piranesi. This ones are not there. Perhaps not all engravings of the Piranesi workshop are contained in my edition, but I have looked many times at them and I can recognize his style faultlessly. And therefore I am pretty sure that the engravings under your chapter "Piranesi and Pompeii" are not the work of Piranesi. Also, Piranesi had another view, he still knew about the magnificence of the Ancient World. The etchings you published contain the view of typical historians, are first half of 19t century I think, and of different origin (the first two have captions in Italian, the others in French). This resolves your problem that Piranesi knew too much.
Which one of the two Piranesis are you talking about, Francesco or Bautista?
 
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#29
Korben, I am talking about Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778). Is there another one?
CyborgNinja, Andreas Tschurilow was the first who demonstrated that Pompeii was buried in 1631. He died in 2013 but his website is still online, www.tschurilow.de, also with materials on Pompeii. He published two books on Pompeii, in German, Die Besonderheiten der Wasserleitung von Domenico Fontana (Sarnokanal) und das Datum des Untergangs von Pompeji, GRIN Verlag, 2009, and Nicht der letzte Tag von Pompeij, Bookstream, Moskou, 2011. A long article with many illustrations, also in German, Nicht der letzte Tag von Pompeji (Not the last day of Pompeii) can be found in the reading room of the website of Uwe Topper, www.chronologiekritik.de. I wrote on the findings of Tschurilow here (in Dutch) and once more here.
 

Verity

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#31
Korben, I am talking about Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778). Is there another one?
CyborgNinja, Andreas Tschurilow was the first who demonstrated that Pompeii was buried in 1631. He died in 2013 but his website is still online, www.tschurilow.de, also with materials on Pompeii. He published two books on Pompeii, in German, Die Besonderheiten der Wasserleitung von Domenico Fontana (Sarnokanal) und das Datum des Untergangs von Pompeji, GRIN Verlag, 2009, and Nicht der letzte Tag von Pompeij, Bookstream, Moskou, 2011. A long article with many illustrations, also in German, Nicht der letzte Tag von Pompeji (Not the last day of Pompeii) can be found in the reading room of the website of Uwe Topper, www.chronologiekritik.de. I wrote on the findings of Tschurilow here (in Dutch) and once more here.
I found your statement (and accompanying image);

'Curiously, the perpetrator of this disaster, "God", is wearing the garments of a bishop,' particularly interesting.

pompei1631-02.gif

That's around the time give or take a few tens of years that they really got going on christianity in all its forms. Matches the general time frame of the re-writes and reinterpretations of the KJB and Shakespeare too- the 'new language' to dominate the 'new world' of interconnected trade and commerce; phoney phonetic Venetian Phoenicians.
 

whitewave

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#32
U.S. Geological Survey. Google book: Vesuvius: Education, Security and Prosperity edited by Flavio Dobran. link

1546111592168.png
1546111643349.png

Two names mentioned on these plaques put the date in the 1600's. King Philip IV (April 1605 – 17 September 1665) and Emmanuel Francesca Viceroy to King Philip IV. (King Philip IV could refer to The 13th century King of France but the additional name of Francesca points to the correct King referred to).

The Google book by Dobran especially and explicitly states "On 16th and 17 December 1631 this [the town of Portici] and other surrounding towns were completely destroyed by Vesuvius, and in the memory of those who perished the Spanish Viceroy Emmanuel Francesca erected a memorial the following year". It also erupted in 1767 (p. 172) And again on the evening of August 8th, 1779 causing earthquakes in Naples and Portici with a lava fountain "reaching 3 km" but states that "Naples suffered more from the intemperance of its population than from the infuriated volcano" (p. 172).

With a history of such frequent eruptions, it's possible Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79 but all other evidence points to the conclusion that if a eruption occurred, it was not the obliterating cataclysm portrayed by history. We have documentation of it erupting twice in 12 years (1767-1779) but most of the damage done to the towns was from the riotous behavior of the panicked citizenry. In 1787 Goethe traveled to Italy and in one of his excursions to Pompeii remarked on the town saying, "even in its present desolate condition..." and "that ancient town [of Herculaneum] located at the foot of Vesuvius, was completely covered with lava, made deeper by subsequent eruptions, so that the buildings are now (in 1787) 60 feet below the surface". Everything was covered with a grey ash. *He must have visited Pompeii right after the 1779 eruption.
*Interesting side note mentioned by Goethe is that the museum housing the artifacts/treasures/relics/art retrieved from the ruins were not allowed to be sketched. (p.170)
 
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#33
so, i brought this up to my housemate, who's from Napoli, and studied official history.. he hated it!
he explained the reason Pompei is mentioned on 16/17th century maps (before uncovering the "ancient" town) is due to it always existing as a town... not so! [thanks wiki :whistle:]

"Modern Pompei was founded in 1891 after the building of the Shrine of Our Lady of Pompei by Bartolo Longo."

that being said, as he lives in the city, I will ask him more questions and see what the natives have to say about it! such an interesting topic

so i just took a quick peek at the "1891" church... first bit about it:
"Bartolo Longo started restoring a church in disrepair in October 1873"
"The original building built between 1876 and 1891 and designed by Antonio Cua followed a Latin cross plan"

and then there's Longo himself...
"Blessed Bartolo Longo was an Italian lawyer... ...He was a former satanist who returned to the Christian faith and became a third order Dominican... He was eventually awarded a papal knighthood" so he's not an architect, builder, engineer? but ran a restoration project on a huge, ornate church? yeahhhhh
this makes very little sense :ROFLMAO: everything surrounding ANY of these subjects seems so fishy
 
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sonoman

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#37
I found your statement (and accompanying image);

'Curiously, the perpetrator of this disaster, "God", is wearing the garments of a bishop,' particularly interesting.


That's around the time give or take a few tens of years that they really got going on christianity in all its forms. Matches the general time frame of the re-writes and reinterpretations of the KJB and Shakespeare too- the 'new language' to dominate the 'new world' of interconnected trade and commerce; phoney phonetic Venetian Phoenicians.
this is a perfect illustration of the creator 'god' creating a flat earth lol. on other words, just a man writing history on paper (or re writing it for those who eat (buy into) from the hisss tree)

the Image of pineapple on an alter with the two snakes on each side seems to be related to the caduceus symbol and may symbolize the pineal gland (higher nature) being stalked by the snakes (lower nature) in waiting to strike anything that arises out of the higher nature (ideas/creativity/magic) to bring it down to earth as it is in heaven. (re creation)
 

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