America in Asia: 1827 State of Nations map

KorbenDallas

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#1
This map makes very little sense when viewed from the traditionally dogmatic point of view. As a matter of fact it makes no sense at all. There would have to be some drastic developments in the history of this world for this map to make sense. Why do we even have a map like this? Why do we have America in Asia, and Scythia in Europe?

Antique hand colored map, from Anthony Finley's "A New General Atlas, Comprising a Complete Set of Maps, representing Grand Divisions of the Globe, Together with the Several Empires, Kingdoms, and States in the World; Compiled from the Best Authorities, and corrected by the Most Recent Discoveries", 1827. From the section : "Atlas Classica; or Select Maps of Ancient Geography, both Sacred and Profane" 1827.

State of Nations at the Christian Era
1827
1827_Map_of_Nations.JPG

1827_Map_of_Nations_1.jpg

Map Source: State of Nations at the Christian aera From Pinkerton on the Goths

In the 1820's, Anthony Finley produced a series of fine atlases in the then leading American cartographic center, Philadelphia. Finley's work is a good example of the quality that American publishers were beginning to obtain. Each map is elegantly presented, with crisp and clear engraving and very attractive pastel hand shading. Topographical and political information is copious, including counties, towns, rivers, and roads. This 1820s was a period of significant development in the eastern United States, with great growth of population, expansion of the transportation nexus, and political changes. As Finley was very concerned to depict as up-to-date detail as was possible, his maps show this development in a graphic and most informative manner. Finley's maps present an accurate and fascinating picture of the United States in the early decades of the nineteenth century. This is an excellent series of maps from the nascent American cartographic world.

Note: I was unable to find a Wikipedia page dedicated to this Anthony Finley cartographer. There was one in Wikimedia with a bunch of maps on there. Makes you wonder why?...

Some Anthony Finley related links:
* * * * *

KD: Why would we have this 1827 map so seriously messed up, or is there something we do not now?

We could probably blame John Pinkerton for the weirdness of this map, but he died impoverished. This particular feature has become somewhat of a red flag, as far as historical substitutions go.
 

aceofarms

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#2
Thrace
Scythia
Galia
Cyrene
Hispania
Parthienne (Parthia)
Etc

What is this a 'Roman' map?

You would think by this time we would have not been using these territorial names. And be using country names.


Here's a map moderm of Roman Empire with similar names. I see these territorial names more associated with antiquity.

peak-of-roman-empire.gif
(And with my mentality now. We don't even have a real Roman map if it even existed. How depressing, what have this picture credibility?)

This guy says Romans 'possibly' had maps and Julius Caesar lost his legions on his way back home.
I wonde if he forgot the milk and eggs too. What a freaking joke!
http://ianjamesross.com/journal/2016/8/24/did-the-romans-have-maps

@KorbenDallas will have a chuckle at this quote
"One of the most famous even survives in illustrated form, albeit as a medieval copy. The Peutinger Table, as it’s commonly known, shows a plan of road routes and cities across the world, from Britain to India, although the furthest western section is lost."

"The map is a 13th-century parchment copy of a possible Roman original. It covers Europe (without the Iberian Peninsula and the British Isles), North Africa, and parts of Asia"

Does the only existing trading map of Rome not include Britain and Iberian Pninsula, North Africa because they were ports to American trading?

Not to mention some of this old copies of maps are absolutely horrible and not organised are these forgeries and poor copies done by people who weren't real cartographers? Some of these old maps look so wack.

Peutinger+Table.jpeg

Instead of thinking about the map looking messy because it's a 15th century drawing and that's
'all they could do'

Think about a forger with no art skill trying his best to imitate another drawing.
It looks like a middle schooler did it.


Unless I'm misinformed and this is an alternate style of map?

Tartary and America right next to each other?
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#4
It says on the map, “according to ancient opinion”. I would like to see that opinionated book he extracted that opinion out of, or may be there was no book...
 

parta

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#5
It says on the map, “according to ancient opinion”. I would like to see that opinionated book he extracted that opinion out of, or may be there was no book...
i think that says

-ocean according to ancient opinion-

that would be okeanos and its equivalents vourukasa, neserser, apsu etc.

its not opinion anymore actually.

14,220 bp

13,010 bp

11,640 bp

peace
 
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dreamtime

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#6
I think it's a historic map that references older ideas. My hypothesis is that America only split off from Asia during the last millenium, possibly 1400-1500, which isn't easily verifiable but makes sense in the light of cultural patterns between East Asia and America, for example the use of Corn in both India and South America.
 
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humanoidlord

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#7
a historic map from 1800's, hmmmm
looks like america once owned part of asia and europe, and everthing else was owned by the scythians
man this is really confusing, its almost like something from another dimension
 
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#10
Maybe this fit in the narrative. 1867 there was a "Alaska Purchase" , Russia sells Alaska for 7,2 million to the United States.
Others say that Alaska was only rented. The handover was in october 1867 , same time as change from julian calendar to gregorian calendar . Hmm...
Maybe this is a coverstory, especially if the press said "Russians dumbest Deal"
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#11
The Alaska deal was most likely an arrangement of land transfer it inherited from Tartaria, in my opinion. The time frame is interesting. 1865ish is definitely a landmark.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#13
There is also this document here. The Russian Possessions in North America - almost 586,412 square miles of land - were sold for just $7.2 million in gold (or about $114 million in today's money), or, in other words, at approximately two cents per acre.

31Alaska_bill_of_sal.jpg
I think it's just a paper trail. Russia never got its money, due to some mysterious sinking of the ship carrying that gold, or something like that. Pretty sure it was an arrangement to re-adjust former Tartarian lands. IMO.
 
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