Ancient bridge construction as presented by Piranesi in the 18th century

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
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#1
Trying to comprehend the improbable is hard enough. Taking it to a different level would be trying to understand the impossible. The known level of technology in the mid-18th century is refusing to support advanced engineering presented on the below Piranesi engravings.

Piranesi's engravings demonstrate our world as it was after some global mud-flood related catacataclysm.
  • Was he a survivor belonging to the civilization responsible for building all those structures?
  • Was he one of the newcomers who stumbled upon the ruins of these marvelous buildings?
Piranesi-Portrait.jpg
1720-1778

From the traditionally taught point of view, both of the above questions are incorrect from the get go. Today's scholars preach that Piranesi's images influenced future Romanticism and Surrealism. In other words, he was making stuff up. Sounds pretty similar to our cartographers of the past, who were accused of filling in the blank spots on the maps with some fake data.

Well, here is one additional example of something made up by Giovanni Battista Piranesi. This time it is going to be a few bridge building plans, and images of the constructed bridges.

Whoever chooses to pay close attention will notice, that this bridge is like an iceberg. What we see above the water is a small portion of what's hidden below.

Comparing rare humans depicted in the drawings to the magnitude of the structures, I could only wonder how they managed to pull it off. Did those construction workers of the past have to reroute the river to lay this huge complicated foundation?

How could Piranesi know all this? Did he come up on some old documents, and just copied those?

Piranesi_Bridge_09.jpg
(are those Egyptian symbols above?)
Piranesi_Bridge_13.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_15.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_12.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_01.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_02.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_16.jpg
multiple bricks are "custom" made for their specific location in the structure
Piranesi_Bridge_03.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_04.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_07.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_10.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_11.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_14.jpg
Piranesi_Bridge_05.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_06.jpg Piranesi_Bridge_08.jpg
There is an article in Wikipedia about this type of bridges. They are called Skew Arches. Nowhere in that article does it show what's below the surface. Why? The same Wikipedia article lists quite a few examples of these Skew Arch Bridges. The last one was built over 110 years ago. Go figure. It's prior to the magic 1920 date.

Apparently we do not build bridges like this any more. Today, our civilization is using techniques which fall in line with the direction of our technological development. It sure does make sense. Could we build a bridge like in the images above? Sure we could, but it would probably cost its weight in gold. Obviously it is much easier to use a more practical, and better understood approach. Yet, for the ancients this type of construction appeared to present no problem what so ever. What did they know, that we don't?

Piranesi_Building_1.jpg Piranesi_Building_2.jpg Piranesi_Building_3.jpg Piranesi_Building_4.jpg Piranesi_Building_5.jpg Piranesi_Building_6.jpg

We also do not construct buildings like this any more. Could it be for the same very reason?

The questions remains:
  • Who built all these?
  • Where did they get the knowledge?
  • How did they develop that knowledge?
  • Where did the knowledge go?
  • Why is everything so huge? Was it built by, and for Giants like below?
17_century_giant_2.png

* * * * *
This group of engravings only shows a few buildings. At the same time these several structures would probably require a factory (or two) to supply the construction, an institution to provide human resources, a transportation company to deliver everything, and quality control to make sure they do not collapse. And the quality was pretty high. Some of the buildings are still there for you to enjoy.

Basilic_Vatican_Piranesi.jpg Basilic_Vatican.jpg
Pantheon_Rome_Piranesi.jpg Pantheon_Rome.jpg

Of course we could assume an ignorant approach, and say, they simply laid brick after brick, and the end result was this bridge, or that three story 50 foot building. The other option would be searching for an answer. Both are available.
 

CyborgNinja

Active member
Messages
54
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100
#2
The scale of these buildings just blows my mind, often the number of columns per square metre is too much for what its supporting. It seems over engineered but you get the feeling they weren't building for practicality but rather aesthetic.

The hieroglyphics are a form of pictogram, meaning communicated through images. Chinese is also pictographic. These writing styles act as the foundation for later languages to build up from. Egyptian was not unique to Egypt but rather the proto-text created by the ancients that would later go on to inform the development of later more complex writing methods such as the 'Alphabets'. Egyptian, Greek, Latin and Chinese for that matter aren't separate languages but infact the evolution of one cultures language through time.

Hieroglyphics were the language of the Giants for sure.
 

mateohielo

New member
Messages
5
Likes
7
#3
From Wikipedia:
"It is important to look at his contribution as an archaeologist, which was acknowledged at the time as he had been elected to the London Society of Antiquaries. His influence of technical drawings in antiquarian publications is often overshadowed. He left explanatory notes in the lower margin about the structure and ornament. Most ancient monuments in Rome were abandoned in fields and gardens. Piranesi tried to preserve them with his engravings. To do this, Piranesi pushed himself to achieve realism in his work. A third of the monuments in Piranesi's engravings have disappeared, and the stucco and surfacings were often stolen, restored and modified clumsily. Piranesi's precise observational skills allow people to experience the atmosphere in Rome in the eighteenth century. Piranesi may have recognised his role to disseminate remarkable information through meaningful images. He became the Director of the Portici Museum in 1751."

It is very hard for me to believe that someone with such a great attention to accuracy and detail just decided to make some things up.

Very glad i found this forum, thanks for all your hard work!
 

humanoidlord

Active member
Messages
263
Likes
110
#5
(are those Egyptian symbols above?)
looks like they are

multiple bricks are "custom" made for their specific location in the structure
that first drawing made me speechless! i am pretty sure not even modern bridges have such an complex structure

Trying to comprehend the improbable is hard enough. Taking it to a different level would be trying to understand the impossible. The known level of technology in the mid-18th century is refusing to support advanced engineering presented on the below Piranesi engravings.

Piranesi's engravings demonstrate our world as it was after some global mud-flood related catacataclysm.
  • Was he a survivor belonging to the civilization responsible for building all those structures?
  • Was he one of the newcomers who stumbled upon the ruins of these marvelous buildings?

From the traditionally taught point of view, both of the above questions are incorrect from the get go. Today's scholars preach that Piranesi's images influenced future Romanticism and Surrealism. In other words, he was making stuff up. Sounds pretty similar to our cartographers of the past, who were accused of filling in the blank spots on the maps with some fake data.

Well, here is one additional example of something made up by Giovanni Battista Piranesi. This time it is going to be a few bridge building plans, and images of the constructed bridges.

Whoever chooses to pay close attention will notice, that this bridge is like an iceberg. What we see above the water is a small portion of what's hidden below.

Comparing rare humans depicted in the drawings to the magnitude of the structures, I could only wonder how they managed to pull it off. Did those construction workers of the past have to reroute the river to lay this huge complicated foundation?

How could Piranesi know all this? Did he come up on some old documents, and just copied those?

There is an article in Wikipedia about this type of bridges. They are called Skew Arches. Nowhere in that article does it show what's below the surface. Why? The same Wikipedia article lists quite a few examples of these Skew Arch Bridges. The last one was built over 110 years ago. Go figure. It's prior to the magic 1920 date.

Apparently we do not build bridges like this any more. Today, our civilization is using techniques which fall in line with the direction of our technological development. It sure does make sense. Could we build a bridge like in the images above? Sure we could, but it would probably cost its weight in gold. Obviously it is much easier to use a more practical, and better understood approach. Yet, for the ancients this type of construction appeared to present no problem what so ever. What did they know, that we don't?


We also do not construct buildings like this any more. Could it be for the same very reason?

The questions remains:
  • Who built all these?
  • Where did they get the knowledge?
  • How did they develop that knowledge?
  • Where did the knowledge go?
  • Why is everything so huge? Was it built by, and for Giants like below?

* * * * *
This group of engravings only shows a few buildings. At the same time these several structures would probably require a factory (or two) to supply the construction, an institution to provide human resources, a transportation company to deliver everything, and quality control to make sure they do not collapse. And the quality was pretty high. Some of the buildings are still there for you to enjoy.


Of course we could assume an ignorant approach, and say, they simply laid brick after brick, and the end result was this bridge, or that three story 50 foot building. The other option would be searching for an answer. Both are available.
were can i find his engravings online, i found them oddly fascinating
 
Last edited:

in cahoots

Active member
Messages
62
Likes
115
#6
The hieroglyphics are a form of pictogram, meaning communicated through images. Chinese is also pictographic. These writing styles act as the foundation for later languages to build up from. Egyptian was not unique to Egypt but rather the proto-text created by the ancients that would later go on to inform the development of later more complex writing methods such as the 'Alphabets'. Egyptian, Greek, Latin and Chinese for that matter aren't separate languages but infact the evolution of one cultures language through time.

Hieroglyphics were the language of the Giants for sure.
Actually, the Asian languages do not share a common root with European. There are a few weird little cognates in there, but the two families seem to have developed independently if you follow the etymology. Whereas nearly all the languages of Eastern and Western Europe, as well as much of the Middle East and the Indian sub-continent, imply a theoretical root language called Proto-Indo-European, or the Pie language. It is a rough sketch of the language that might've been spoken, though it is quite beautiful.

Nonetheless, I would agree with you that the inclusion of hieroglyphics here is a testament to the ancient origins of this dizzying construction technique. I think this site is due for a big article about the pyramids actually, as the really impressive ones have enough of the same hallmarks as these brick structures to imply a continuity.

We are beyond manpower here.
 

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
496
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660
#7
Egyptian topic is very confusing. While traditionally you cannot discover something which everybody knows about, it appears strange, that we really find out about Egypt's Antiquity around 17-18 centuries. Egyptian Pyramids pop up on the screen of our civilization between 1750 and 1800.

I have a little concept, I might share at some point. Will need to acquire some additional tinfoil for that though. It makes a whole lot of sense to me, but sounds way too bananas crazy.

Check this Piranesi image out. It really is something. Anyone wants to translate? :LOL:

Piranesy_Egyptian_Theme_StolenHistory.ORG.jpg

As far as Piranesi images go, I'm pretty sure they are spread out in single images all over the internet. I would like to get a single batch of every single image as well.
 

Hardy

Member
Messages
40
Likes
98
#10
More giants...Here they are rare attractions in some Kind of collossal open air theatre.
I'm also impressed by the quality of the old engravings by the way,especially by piranesi of course but also others.Even here: Is there anybody
who can do it today on this scale ? All actual engravers i was able to find are dilettantes in comparison.


Picture: http://bibliotheque-numerique.inha.fr/viewer/25620/?offset=#page=1&viewer=picture


riesen.png
 
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