Bodhidharma: The blue eyed Devil. Was there an effort by this man and others to re-civilize mankind after the flood?

CyborgNinja

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#1
BhodiDaruma blue eyed devil.jpg

There are particular legends past down to us from history, legends that speak of a time of darkness. It is said that a great flood had consumed the world. All but the loftiest of places were swallowed up by the waters and that only but a few pockets of humanity survived this great calamity. In time the water receded and mankind once again began to repopulate the low lands.

All over the world the people began to rebuild, there was an understanding that there had once been a great civilization before this flood but what exactly had been lost was unknown and the people did the best they could, however in many places the people were confused and remembered nothing. In these places there was great suffering, cannibalism was commonly practiced and the people were profoundly desperate.

One such place was what is today modern day India, the people there remembered much and the practice of Buddhism was known by many. However the teachings were incomplete and the priesthood confused as to the original message. Then one day a man came from from the ocean. He landed on the southern coast of India. A lone traveler, he was said to be very old.

This man was described as being very strange in appearance, his features were unique to him alone and shared by no other person in this region. The man was bald with a long red beard and full mustache. His eyes were said to be as blue as the sky and his nose, quite pronounced. These traits were not shared by any of the local people and he spoke their language although crudely at first. This was truly evidence to the people that he was from else where. A stranger in a strange land who brought with him the teachings of what he called "the way" or "the knowing."

BodhidharmaYoshitoshi1887.jpg Central_Asian_Buddhist_Monks.jpeg Bodhidharma_Shaolinsi.JPG A_Civilized_Daruma.jpg
bogidharma Closeup.png darumaKite.jpg daruma doll japan.jpg
Depictions of Bhodidharma.

Although his true name is lost to the ages, he was known by the people of India as "Bodhidharma" and later in China and Japan as "Daruma". But who was Bodi-hi-Dhar-ma the "blue eyed devil" often depicted with a red beard, and what was his message to the people of these lands?
Bodhidharma was a Buddhist monk who lived during the 5th or 6th century. He is traditionally credited as the transmitter of Chan Buddhism to China, and regarded as its first Chinese patriarch. According to Chinese legend, he also began the physical training of the monks of Shaolin Monastery that led to the creation of Shaolin kungfu. In Japan, he is known as Daruma.

Little contemporary biographical information on Bodhidharma is extant, and subsequent accounts became layered with legend.

According to the principal Chinese sources, Bodhidharma came from the Western Regions, which refers to Central Asia but may also include the Indian subcontinent, and was either a "Persian Central Asian"or a "South Indian [...] the third son of a great Indian king." Throughout Buddhist art, Bodhidharma is depicted as an ill-tempered, profusely-bearded, wide-eyed non-Chinese person. He is referred as "The Blue-Eyed Barbarian" (Chinese: 碧眼胡; pinyin: Bìyǎnhú) in Chan texts.
Aside from the Chinese accounts, several popular traditions also exist regarding Bodhidharma's origins.

The accounts also differ on the date of his arrival, with one early account claiming that he arrived during the Liu Song dynasty (420–479) and later accounts dating his arrival to the Liang dynasty (502–557). Bodhidharma was primarily active in the territory of the Northern Wei (386-634). Modern scholarship dates him to about the early 5th century.

Bodhidharma's teachings and practice centered on meditation and the Laṅkāvatāra Sūtra. The Anthology of the Patriarchal Hall (952) identifies Bodhidharma as the 28th Patriarch of Buddhism in an uninterrupted line that extends all the way back to the Gautama Buddha himself.
-Wikipedia.

Bodhidharma is a enigmatic figure in east Asian religion and his influence cannot be understated. Yes it is said he was blue eyed, so was he Caucasian perhaps? The term devil in Asian culture referred to a foreigner as their facial features were often found to be quite striking and garish compared with that of the more familiar locals. It was not uncommon for this phrase to be attributed to western sailors by the Japanese of the Edo period. Even today the term "Gaijin" or "Foreign devil is used". The Devil is better translated as "strikingly different" rather than some "demonic evil."

So a Caucasian teaching man comes to Asia with a message for the people, lets hear more of this mysterious person...
An Indian tradition regards Bodhidharma to be the third son of a Pallava king from Kanchipuram. This is consistent with the Southeast Asian traditions which also describe Bodhidharma as a former South Indian Tamil prince who had awakened his kundalini and renounced royal life to become a monk.
-Wikipedia.

Firstly there is some confusion as to his initial origins. Some say he was a Prince from Tamil Nadu, the southern most region of India. Many others argue that he was form across the sea and that Tamil Nadu was simply where he first made land fall, the starting point of his journey. It could equally be argued that the Caste system of India was implemented by the Indo-European peoples who were of Caucasian appearance and had migrated southward from Ancient Persia into what is now India. The ancient Persians were a Blonde blue eyed people. There are many artifacts found in Modern day Iran with depictions of blonde men and the name Iran comes from the term Aryan, a term for blonde, blue eyed peoples.

ayran bowl artifact.jpg India_Tamil_Nadu.png
(left)Persian artifact depicting blonde men.
(Right)Southern most state of India, Tamil Nadu. Originally known as Madras.


The journey to spread enlightenment begins
Bodhidharma left his motherland of India and started his endeavor. Although the actual route of his journey to China is unknown, most scholars believe that he traveled from Madras to Guangzhou province of China through the sea, and then by land to Nanjing.

Some scholars also believe that he cross the Pamir Plateau walking, along the Yellow River to Luoyang. Luoyang was famous as an active center for Buddhism at that time. It is said that Bodhidharma’s journey to China is said to have taken three years.
-www.zen-buddhism.net

Travels in Southeast Asia
According to Southeast Asian folklore, Bodhidharma travelled from Jambudvipa by sea to Palembang, Indonesia. Passing through Sumatra, Java, Bali, and Malaysia, he eventually entered China through Nanyue. In his travels through the region, Bodhidharma is said to have transmitted his knowledge of the Mahayana doctrine and the martial arts. Malay legend holds that he introduced forms to silat.

Vajrayana tradition links Bodhidharma with the 11th-century south Indian monk Dampa Sangye who travelled extensively to Tibet and China spreading tantric teachings.
-Wikipedia.

The father of Kung fu.

He was said to be the father of Shaolin kung fu.
Some Chinese myths and legends describe Bodhidharma as being disturbed by the poor physical shape of the Shaolin monks, after which he instructed them in techniques to maintain their physical condition as well as teaching meditation. He is said to have taught a series of external exercises called the Eighteen Arhat Hands and an internal practice called the Sinew Metamorphosis Classic. In addition, after his departure from the temple, two manuscripts by Bodhidharma were said to be discovered inside the temple: the Yijin Jing and the Xisui Jing. Copies and translations of the Yijin Jing survive to the modern day. The Xisui Jing has been lost.
-Wikipedia.

This idea of a Caucasian man coming from a far off land to spread lessons of knowledge and enlightenment to the common people is not unique to Asia. There are the legends of the Viracocha of south and central America who were described as white bearded men of European appearance that either taught or created civilization and fundamental rules for the native people to live by. Often remembered fondly for eradicating the practice of cannibalism among the primitive tribesmen. These great teachers were said to have come from across the sea then after a time left the back to whence they came. A sort of ancient humanitarian effort.

MocheBeardedMen.jpg
Moche ceramic vessels depicting bearded men.
Modern advocates of theories such as a pre-Columbian European migration to Peru cite these bearded ceramics and Viracocha's beard as being evidence for an early presence of non-Amerindians in Peru. -Graham Hancock. Fingerprints of the Gods.
“All the Indians agree that they were created by this Viracocha, who they believe was a man of medium height, white and clothed in a white robe gathered around his body, and that he carried a staff and a book in his hands. After this, they tell a strange story; that is, that after this Viracocha created all the people, he came walking to a place where a large group had congregated … Viracocha continued his journey, doing the works of piety and instructing the people he had created … and wishing to leave the land of Peru, he gave a speech to those he had created, advising them of things which were to happen in the future. He warned them that people would come saying that they were the Viracocha, their creator, and that the people should not believe the impostors, but that in the coming ages he would send his messengers to teach and support them. And having said this, he and his two companions went into the ocean and walked away over the waters, without sinking, as if they had been walking on land.”
-lds.org

CN summary:

I can imagine a situation in which immediately proceeding the initial great flood, Noah's flood. A mission by the survivors, perhaps those who were able to escape with in a vault or aboard some ship returning and setting forth to re-educate the scattered survivors. There is a Wachowski brothers film Cloud atlas in which the later half of the film depicts an advanced space faring civilization of humans returning to Earth hundreds of years in the future to find the population living a primitive tribal lifestyle and these advanced people rescue the tribal people from this primitive state. Its the exact same concept. I'd bet my bottom dollar, that some European group set out to do rescue the earth from their own ignorance and we have only these scattered myths to remember them by. Why I think these great civilizers were European is simply based on the reports of their appearance. The blue eyes and red beard were a distinguishing factor in these myths that set Bhodi apart from his Chinese and Indian followers. The long white beards of the Viracocha of central America for instance, full beards are not a genetic trait of the native people found in that region. Its also significant to mention that descriptions of Buddah mention he had blue eyes and gold coloured skin, its does also say he had forty teeth and that the palms of the hands could touch the knees without bending so take it with a grain of salt I guess, but the point still stands.

Related links..
www.onmarkproductions.com
Redice radio:
Radio 3Fourteen - Ali Aliabadi - Bodhidharma: The Blue-Eyed, Red-Bearded Barbarian
 
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KorbenDallas

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#2
I know nothing about this esteemed Bodhidharma guy, so there is some interesting reading ahead of me. Thank you at @CyborgNinja. But I immediately ran into one of his sayings which suggests much more than meets the eye.

bodhidharma_on_worship_1.jpg

Also for whatever reason, there are some paintings out there with an Asian gentleman (Dazu Huike?) cutting his hand off in front of our Bodhidharma.

bodhidharma-and-hui-ke01.jpg Bodhidharma-Huike-Doseonsa-2007.jpg Bodhidharma-Huike-Dale3.jpg
 

KorbenDallas

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#4
Yeah i dont know what thats about. Kinda weird. Could be a metaphor for something.
"Legend has it that Bodhidharma initially refused to teach Huike. Huike stood in the snow outside Bodhidharma’s cave all night, until the snow reached his waist. In the morning Bodhidharma asked him why he was there. Huike replied that he wanted a teacher to "open the gate of the elixir of universal compassion to liberate all beings".
Bodhidharma refused, saying, “how can you hope for true religion with little virtue, little wisdom, a shallow heart, and an arrogant mind? It would just be a waste of effort.”
Finally, to prove his resolve, Huike cut off his left arm and presented it to the First Patriarch as a token of his sincerity. Bodhidharma then accepted him as a student, and changed his name from Shenguang to Huike, which means "Wisdom and Capacity"." - Cutting off his arm


A legend...
 

kentucky

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#5
The level of immediate synchronicity I am experiencing on this board is uncanny. Just this morning, I had hoped to reach on to all here on their thoughts on Marco Polo, but alas it is through this post that I may now offer some speculative pieces and reach out to see if anyone else can add to it. So here's where my thoughts have been wandering, as may relate to the Bodhidharma.

When visiting Thailand years ago, I saw a statue at Wat Po and inquired about who was being venerated, having assumed that it was a representation of some historical warrior king. Turns out, as I was told, it was said to be a statue of Marco Polo. To be sure, there were various statues there that were attributed to Marco Polo.

Matter of fact (in a generally accepted accounting for some of the statues), in one area of the temple, standing side-by-side guarding an entrance called the Marco Polo gate, there are two that are *both* interchangeably said to represent Marco Polo, sporting what anachronistically appear to be top hats.

2016-12-09-Wat-Pho-Bangkok-Marco-Polo-statues-11-15.jpg

And yet, there are a few bearded statues within the same temple complex that are also said to be of Marco Polo, although many others also generically refer to them as "guardian statues".

marco-polo.jpg

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I found such apparent veneration of Marco Polo there surprising, as it seems that he would be but a footnote in the general history of Thailand, much less represented at a Buddhist temple. Nevertheless, he was indeed supposedly the first westerner alleged to have visited the far east - which brings me to my main curiosity.

Did Marco Polo really ever exist? Could he be a result of a merging of different legends of someone arriving from the sea? Indeed, there are accounts of westerners visiting the east that predate Marco Polo. St Thomas (and/or gnostic Jesus/Ceasarion) were said to have arrived in India in the1st Century to establish the Nestorian arm of the Christian church, for example. To be sure, the reappearance of 'the sea people' in many cultures' ancient origin stories also fascinate me, and I'm curious how this all may fit together - but I digress.

And then there are the tales of Prester John, which is what brings me to what I'm curious about the most. Who was Prester John really, and could he have been Marco Polo, the Blue-eyed devil, and St. Thomas/Jesus/Ceasarion all in one? In fact, I believe we arrive at the story of Prester John through the supposed journals of Marco Polo, himself.
 
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CyborgNinja

CyborgNinja

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#6
Who was Prester John really, and could he have been Marco Polo, the Blue-eyed devil, and St. Thomas/Jesus/Ceasarion all in one? In fact, I believe we arrive at the story of Prester John through the supposed journals of Marco Polo, himself.
I can easily see all these different characters actually being the same person. Compressing the timeline definately helps with investigative break throughs in regards to stolen history.

Oh and there is no such thing as coincidence. Only synchronicity.

"Always remember that it matters not whether a thing is significant or not. What matters is whether that thing is significant to YOU." -Terrace McKenna.

We are all the main character of our own journey. Never maginalize your own experience. You are the most important person in your life. Believe it.

Yes we want to help others but first we must begin with ourselves. So what ever it was that sync'd up for you just now, I hope it helps you grow.
 

KorbenDallas

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#7
This depiction of Marco Polo reminded me of a certain character from the Pirates of the Caribbean.

beards_1.jpg

Additionally, I think we should bring out the topic of Prester John as a separate thread. His story is to big of an issue in itself, and we do not want to derail this thread.
 

kentucky

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Oh and there is no such thing as coincidence. Only synchronicity.

"Always remember that it matters not whether a thing is significant or not. What matters is whether that thing is significant to YOU." -Terrace McKenna.

We are all the main character of our own journey. Never marginalize your own experience. You are the most important person in your life. Believe it.

Yes we want to help others but first we must begin with ourselves. So what ever it was that sync'd up for you just now, I hope it helps you grow.
Such reminders from voices outside one's daily routine can only serve to help one maintain (or re-establish) focus on one's path. I am surely very grateful for the reminders and for the shared wisdom, thanks much and cheers.
This depiction of Marco Polo reminded me of a certain character from the Pirates of the Caribbean.

Additionally, I think we should bring out the topic of Prester John as a separate thread. His story is to big of an issue in itself, and we do not want to derail this thread.
I can see the resemblance. And yes please and for sure, I look forward to it.
 
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sharonr

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#10
I've been to Japan. These are from Nara, the original capital:

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It is a park. I was all by myself traveling through Japan..Nara: .biking and the deer are everywhere. apparently the deer are allowed to thrive in Nara. Beautiful. Look at the scale of the structures. That is me at the bottom :)
 
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BStankman

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#11
I know nothing about this esteemed Bodhidharma guy, so there is some interesting reading ahead of me. Thank you at @CyborgNinja. But I immediately ran into one of his sayings which suggests much more than meets the eye.

White man speaks with forked tongue again. Really hard to tell if he is a deceiver or teaching about the deceit in that statement.

In India we have a tall redhead bringing civilization. North India is Aryan, so they are pointing out a difference here.
In China they are doing everything they can to hide the tall redheads in the earth pyramids.
In Mongolia we have Genghis Khan, a tall red head that 1 in 200 people are descended from.
And in the Americas we have the legend of Lovelock cave where the tall redheads were crazed cannibals.


maps-of-the-world-32.jpg
 
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#12
Hi Everyone,

This is my first post on stolenhistory.org , thanks to @CyborgNinja for this post - I think I may have something of interest to add.

As OP mentioned, Bodhidharma is said to be "A stranger in a strange land who brought with him the teachings of what he called "the way" or "the knowing."

It is my belief that Bodhidharma went to India to teach Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching to the people, in order to Enlighten the world after all the knowledge was lost after the mud-flood.

Further along the post it is said that Bodhidharma taught the monks Kung-Fu - I agree that this is entirely possible - but as with most of our recent (and not so recent) re-telling of history I think we may find that the story of Bodhidharma is also incomplete and/or obscured in some way. Most of the martial arts disciplines would have been used as a tool to help maintain discipline whilst Walking the Path of Light.

The Tao is divided into two chapters: Chapter One "The Way" (I shit you not :) , and Chapter Two "The Power" or "The Knowing" - same thing really.

From my research I found out that currently there are over two hundred translations of the Tao available, I would like to point you to this translation, which absolutely changed my life.

29.

Want to take over the world?
Think again.
The world's a holy place.
You can't just fuck around with it.
Those who try to change it destroy it.
Those who try to possess it lose it.


~Lao Tzu

The Tao Te Ching.~ A modern interpretation of Lao Tzu perpetrated by Ron Hogan.

I strongly encourage the reader to read this book.

If you are not sure what "Tao" is, you can replace the word Tao with God or Spirit - it fits in most of the time. In my view, Tao, Holy Spirit, God, Prana, Chi etc. are all the same thing. Also, it doesn't matter what it actually is, as long as we figure out how to use it. It's called an unfathomable mystery for a very good reason I think.

What I can tell you, is that this is the true path of Illumination, the path to the knowledge. The Akashic record if you will (it's not what you think it is though). And let me tell you, knowledge really does exist on more than one level. Book-knowledge being the lowest form of knowledge - there's a very very good reason they burnt books in the old days. Flat Earthers will understand this - just look at how many bullshit Space books there are in the world. So this false knowledge about space is forced into the minds of the young at their most impressionable age - it was not learned naturally or intuitively, that's why it's impossible to get rid of the knowledge now. They simply can not shift Heliocentrism out of their heads, by way of how the information came in there in the first place - from a book and forced memorization. Repetition is the most basic form of mind control... This is why books are considered evil - because any idiot can write anything in one and force someone else to read it. Having said that, it would have been nice to pick up a book with all the free-energy secrets nicely detailed.

All the good stuff exists only in the mind and is almost impossible to put down on paper in a coherent manner. This I believe is why The Tao is written in such an odd way. To put it simply, the words simply do not want to come out of your head, so you have to be creative.

Not only that... it (the path) still works, and I know this because I have been walking the path for the last year. I understand it and can explain and teach it to a certain degree if anyone is interested?

I am going off-topic now, and I have a lot more information on this subject, however it would be deviating too far from OPs post. Feel free to fire away if you have any questions.

Cheers,
Deejay
 

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