Did they use catapults at Gettysburg during the US Civil War of 1861-65

KorbenDallas

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#1
A catapult is a ballistic device used to launch a projectile a great distance without the aid of explosive devices - particularly various types of ancient and medieval siege engines. In use since ancient times, the catapult has proven to be one of the most effective mechanisms during warfare.

Ancient Roman Catapult.jpg

The official explanation for the below photograph as found on the National Parks website.
A number of men posing as dead soldiers lie across and underneath rocks in Devil’s Den. Library of Congress.
I think the above explanation is a lie. These soldiers are dead, and there is no contemporary plausible explanation for this type of 19th century warfare.

This photograph, taken by Peter Weaver on November 11, 1863, depicts a group of men posing as dead soldiers among rocks in Devil’s Den. The two men standing are doctors, posed as if inspecting the “bodies.” The summit of Little Round Top can be seen in the distance.

Civil_War_Catapult_casualties.jpg

Two years before the end of the Civil War they did not have enough real dead people to photograph, so they had people posing as dead? I find this hard to believe.

This poor fellow could get an Oscar for acting. Unfortunately he does appear to be as dead as they come, with broken spine and unnaturally positioned left arm.

Civil_War_Catapult_casualties_1.jpg

Question: thoughts?

Note: This topic was started based on the above Civil War photograph observed at Reddit's CulturalLayer
 

humanoidlord

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#2
i was going to post that picture earlier as a photographic anomaly
but i never knew that they claimed it is staged, that changes everthing
why would they stage such a scene?
maybe to fake history?
 

whitewave

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#3
The third guy from the left has his arm raised and the "doctor" (also with raised arm) seems to be directing the pose. These guys didn't fall dead into these positions nor did their weapons. They look pretty dead to me (except guy with raised arm) but I think it's some of that post mortem photography. The "doctor" at the far right has thoughtfully placed a jacket under the dead guys head, you know, for comfort.
 

Onijunbei

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#4
They are posing. No dirt on uniforms no blood no bullet wounds... Some guys are being sarcastic by putting their lower bodies in between 2 boulders. The doctor on bottom aint bending over to do any real examination. The doctor on top is not even looking at the "deceased". Doesn't matter tactically which way the battle took place because the men are not in any strategic position to take on fire or fire at targets where they lie. Even the way the guns lie on the ground is posed and not realistic. I can easily recreate the position of the actor in the 2nd photo. Why bother with wax dummies or corpses for a shot that's easier to take with real people. Way more people alive walking around then dead people walking around. Ha. Just my 2 cents
 
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Onijunbei

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#6
Hard for me to make the picture out on this one. I don't see medical personnel or survivors but we got someone able to take a picture. I would have taken the weapons if i was the victorious army. I see a drum set but no pools of blood. No grass no trees..unless the development makes it hard to see grass. Couldn't even tell you where this is allegedly taking place. I've been to Gettysburg not inferring that it looks the same.. Can't tell if these are corpses being used or actors. The quality of the photo seems to be less than the ones I can google about the Civil War interspersed between the paintings. I was gonna mention respect for the dead but their are photos of dead people on Google.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#7
I might have just enough material to present a hypothesis that the war was bigger than just the scope of the American Civil War, and that the real meaning could have been substituted with a false one. Have plenty of respect for the fallen. At the same time I’m in it for the truth.

Too much does not add up. Like these Charleston, SC 1865 photo. What weapons were really used? And why it looks like 1871 after urban fire Chicago? Are the damages related to the same event?

Charlston, SC - 1865.jpg Charlston, SC - 1865_9.png

And what kind of unknown architecture was destroyed?

civil_war_casualties_3.jpg civil_war_casualties_4.jpg
B71B9CAE-FECB-4767-9C9B-25A9F6364B57.jpeg

1860 Rome for comparison

ECB1BB92-14C1-48A2-875C-0DAD20DC6218.jpeg

Where did they hide the development process of the steam boat torpedoes?

civil_war_torpedo.jpg
 

PrincepAugus

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#8
The Civil War had many ironclads at the time. Hiding development of them? More like hiding the war of who gets the ancient tech first.
 

whitewave

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#11
The guy on the far left bottom has his leg bent. It is not possible to keep your leg in that position if you die; it will fall over. I do believe there were massive casualties in the civil war as a few diaries have been published years after the writers have passed (mainly by women). It was not considered ladylike in those days to draw attention to yourself which would include publishing anything you wrote so many diaries/journals were quietly tucked away into attics and found later by surviving relatives. The stories of that time were so poignant and heart-breaking that they gave a personal view of the war not mentioned in newspaper articles. Also, the guy in the foreground just right of center has his arms bent up. Very unnatural position to die in and also not possible to maintain after death.
 
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