Flame-bladed swords. 15th Century Pro-Sports, and the Battle of Anghiari

Hardy

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#21
Great stuff again Folks,all of it - main Post and comments. T as the schwärmer Stock is translated as Swarmer Stock but perhaps 'Hive' is better.Stock means in German also the Bienenstock - the Bees House.

fire2.png


There is no Soap again :

fire1.png


This one is funky again:

fire3.png


A: Name/D:Halbe chartaun = Half '?'/E=Howitzer/G...Böller=firecracker ,oldfashioned cannon?/S(interesting?)= Waterball/Specificatio part: nothing significand
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#22
Thank you Hardy.

Basically we have these two images with what looks like electic bolts, and yet we see no appropriate description of the phenomena.

Than again, the word electricity pops up on the screen around mid 1700s.

If we could single out the language they used for those bolts, that could probably help out in further research.

One additional inage I came across

F98490AC-15DD-40FC-8509-00F5CA548E44.jpeg

It says, “Life without books is Death”. Not sure how picture corresponds to this phrase.

Clearly we have a flame sword looking weapon. Also the Gadsden snake-like flag is another bizarre occurrence.
 

humanoidlord

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#23
This topic piqued my interest, so I decided to try searching around a bit on Archive.org and found a treasure trove of fascinating information:

Rariora; being notes of some of the printed books, manuscripts, historical documents, medals, engravings, pottery, etc., etc., collected (1858-1900) by John Eliot Hodgkin, F.S.A. Vol. III

The lengthy section on fireworks begins HERE, containing a large number of detailed descriptions of events where pyrotechnics were used, invitations/announcements for/regarding such events, as well as numerous engravings--some including detailed diagrams showing how some of the devices (arrows, swords, shields, etc.) were put together:


Medieval "night combatants" make an appearance with flaming swords in hand, from a book entitled A Rich Cabinet, with Variety of Inventions Unlock'd and Open'd for the Recreation of Ingenious Spirits (1677):


From page 36: "The Night Combatants With Faulchions and Targets" (Fig. 5) are familiar objects in the earlier prints of firework displays and are here shown using similar sham weapons to those which were described by Hanzelet.

From the description, it certainly sounds like these types of flaming sword "battles" were a fairly well-known activity.

According to a section on pages 38, there was a guild called the Company of Gunners and Fireworkers at the Arsenal in Zurich that hosted large, elaborate artillery and pyrotechnics demonstrations every year which were engraved into copper by various artists and printed every New Year's Day between (at least) 1689 and 1798. The collection of engravings is called Gesellschafft Der Constaffleren Und Feurwerkeren Im Zeughausse Zu Zurich [Neuiahrs-Blätter, 1689-1798]), and is quite extensive. If one of these folios could be located, I'm certain it would be full of useful information.

In addition to weaponry and armor, there are numerous whimsical items shown in the book which incorporate things like mermaids, lions, dragons, and other creatures into their designs. Many of them look like elaborate flaming parade floats or toys.

This device in particular is especially wild, and I would have loved to have seen what something like this looked like in action:


Of course, there were plenty of examples of beautiful fireworks displays on land and water:


If anyone wishes to dig in, I'm sure there are plenty of goodies yet to be found in this book (related to fireworks as well as other curious things). I've only just begun flipping through. At the very least, expect to learn exactly what it means to be "hoist by your own petard"!
very bizzare, some of these displays are too good to be true, if you catch my drift
Thank you Hardy.

Basically we have these two images with what looks like electic bolts, and yet we see no appropriate description of the phenomena.

Than again, the word electricity pops up on the screen around mid 1700s.

If we could single out the language they used for those bolts, that could probably help out in further research.

One additional inage I came across


It says, “Life without books is Death”. Not sure how picture corresponds to this phrase.

Clearly we have a flame sword looking weapon. Also the Gadsden snake-like flag is another bizarre occurrence.
snake ,dragons and double headed eagles were pretty common, wonder why?
 
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#36
That x-ray of the sword handles - were the swords ornamental or functional? The detail we see appears to be the structure of the handle itself, with the end of the sword blade visible underneath. A functional sword needs a large tang for weight distribution - a large area of sword metal within the grip area. Several of those present partial tangs which are more typical or ornamental swords.

Regarding the Italian 'warrior' class - I remember reading about how people from that part of the world didn't actually fight bloody battles all the time. Some 'wars' were merely group verbal exchanges and insults, as it was with the Zulu of Africa. Maybe that was the case of the OP horse trampling situation? I don't doubt for a minute that there were people (still) who could marshal and control natural forces like electricity. Sometimes there's more to be gained by hiding technology than by using it.

Greek fire is the ultimate pyrotechnique. It's a lot like napalm only impossible to extinguish. It even burns underwater. I believe I have the recipe in an old book on a flash drive, but Wikipedia says it was lost to history.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#40
Today we can write down that it was for swimming.

I have some information on the knights armor. Probably enough for an article one day.
 
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