Foundlings and the Orphan Trains: video by CONSPIRACY-R-US

KorbenDallas

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#1
Orphan-Train-front_12.jpg

Official position: During the 1850s there were thousands of children living on the streets of several major cities. The children were in search of food, shelter, and money and sold rags, matches, and newspapers just to survive. The children formed gangs for protection because life on the street was dangerous and they were regularly victimized. The police often arrested the children, some as young as five years old, and put them in lock up facilities with adult criminals. Determined to remedy the situation, the Children’s Aid Society and the New York Foundling Hospital devised a program to take children off of the streets of New York and Boston and place them in homes in the American West rather than allow them to continue to be arrested and taken advantage of on the streets. Because the children were transported by train to their new homes, the term “orphan trains” began being used.
  • The Orphan Train Movement was a supervised welfare program that transported orphaned and homeless children from crowded Eastern cities of the United States to foster homes located largely in rural areas of the Midwest. The orphan trains operated between 1854 and 1929, relocating about 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, abused, or homeless children.
While the official narrative is talking about 200,000 for the US, it is highly probable that there were millions. Similar orphan related operations were getting executed all over the world. Some children were allegedly moved to a different country. Makes you wonder why, right?
I know the issue of orphaned children has been brought up on this forum before. Therefore, I wanted to encourage our forum members to watch the below YouTube video created by CONSPIRACY-R-US. Inspired by a Flat Earth British video, CONSPIRACY-R-US ties a few things together. The presented analysis could explain why our current civilization has no recollection of any of the catastrophic events which might have happened between 1850s and 1930.

Foundlings and the Orphan Train
by CONSPIRACY-R-US

Sources used:
children_labor_134.jpg

KD: Well, when you put everything together, the picture appears to be rather grim. Without any possibility of asking one of those poor children what really happened to their parents, with the help of the above video, I will suggest the following:
  • Their parents were either killed in our famous "no victim" urban fires (were those a part of one big war?) I think there are reasons to doubt the official narrative. Especially the part where mothers were forced to give up their babies. Could such an atrocity be possible? I assume it could, but such numbers of orphaned children suggest that it was hardly probable. A few may be, but hundreds of thousands? For that we are missing historical accounts mentioning hundreds of thousands of pissed off, armed mothers defending their right to raise their children. It appears that those children simply had no parents left... as in... they were dead.
  • The issue was not limited to the United States. Multiple other countries were in the same boat.
  • Orphans were deliberately relocated (including overseas), separated from siblings in order to break ties with whatever emotional attachments they might have had left.
    • And this: child labor is the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.
  • At this age how much did they understand what was going on? I'm not quite sure, so please help me out.
  • 1850-1930: when they grew up, there was always some war to attend.
Main Question: how much do you think the above could have contributed to the informational void we experience today?

P.S. From what it sounds like, any one of us could be a descendant of one of those poor kids. German, Irish, Italian, Austrian, Russian, American, French... who knows?
P.P.S. Placed this thread in the Abandoned City Series subforum, because it appears to be directly related.
 

in cahoots

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#2
What a bizarre phenomenon. This would have shattered shared histories and preservation of heritage. Work as Parent - get it right deep in the brain and they'll pass it onto their own kids as truth, as civilization worth preserving. These must have been pretty much "factory reset" human beings, culturally slagged out and reforged into whatever shape you like -- get them on the work program, until they get old enough to realize how awful it is watch children do the work, and send them to public school as a preferable alternative -- keep mom and dad at work, let us sculpt your child's mind - though a structurally identical program, where the family link is fragmented as early as possible, and Big Schoolin' gets the foot in the door in terms of what came before, and what's worth knowing now, and to get up and conform the moment that school bell (break whistle) rings. The Prussian school system is a euphemism for child and lifelong labour. The goal isn't education, but profiling and social conditioning for workplace performance. Any child who sought some vocation of his own interest and accord as an alternative to school would likely be separated from his parents- probably a quite natural inclination of any child, given the opportunity and the respect- and relocated with "good" parents, who would willingly submit the child to the education system. A slave program, literally, if one looks into the philosophical origins of modern public education.
 

BStankman

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#3
Main Question: how much do you think the above could have contributed to the informational void we experience today?

P.S. From what it sounds like, any one of us could be a descendant of one of those poor kids. German, Irish, Italian, Austrian, Russian, American, French... who knows?
It ties a lot together for me and this thread. Great/Grandparents and What We Learn From Them
We should know more, but there are many dead ends. I am a little shocked of how little my family knows beyond their own parents.

No one wants to call their grandparents liars, but there were plenty of things it seems they did not want to talk about or have answers for.
The tradition of child labor in families is a clue, if we compare it to the cycle of abuse. As we all age and eventually become our parents.

Immigrants and orphans without roots seems like the the population you would need if you destroyed a civilization and then repopulated it. Pretending the technology and architecture was your own, but lacked the knowledge to reproduce it.
 

Ice Nine

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#4
Anything could have been going on and the children wouldn't really know or even understand what was happening around them.

I find this topic so important and disturbing. And also my family has talked about this many times.
One of my great great grandpas and all his siblings were orphaned in either 1885 when their father died or in 1891 when their mother died.

Both of their parent's came from Posen, Prussia. Their father sailed here in 1871 on the ship the Hansa when he was 17, I don't know when the mom arrived. She is not listed on the passenger list, not that I could find anyway, he was 17, she would only have been 14 at the time. They were married in 1874, in Wisconsin. He was 21 and she was 17 and they eventually had 6 kids.

Enough family history, back to being orphans, the oldest brother, who was either 16 or 11 at the time, We think he must have been 16, because he helped his younger brother (my great great grandpa) and some or all of the kids run away from the orphanage and they came west.
I'm glad they struck out on their own.
Anyway my great great grandpa never talked about it, Other than to say he was an orphan and his brother helped him escape the orphanage. I was able to fill in a few blanks about the family, but it took a lot of digging. So we never had any idea what they did to survive or anything of that nature.
 

dreamtime

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#5
"how much do you think the above could have contributed to the informational void we experience today?"

Obviously giving children away on a grand scale, with new names and a new home, will erase 100% of the entire memory of a generation, because memories are formed during education and takes years of learning and reading. Thus the children learned what their new parents and schools told them as the truth. But the orphan trains is just one small aspect of the larger upheavals in the 19th and 20th Century. Is there even a single developed country that did not experience some form of war? Wars destroy cultural memory. The young men die, and the young women have to work in the hospitals, everyone is busy. It's a shock, and such shocks always suppress memory, to allow all energy be directed at the problem at hand.

I think even in perfect conditions the memories of a society disappear within 3-4 generations and change into myth and fables. Daily life and work just gets everyone in the end.

I think we as humans overestimate the ability of memories to survive. It seems to me it's a complicated process that doesn't even work all by itself, if left alone. No one will know 9/11 was anything but a terrorist attack if it is put into a school book. Even though the majority of people does not believe in the official story. It doesn't matter. We die out, and will be replaced by school books.

Cultural memories are maintained by the intellectuals. When there is no one to write something down, it stops existing.

It doesn't matter how many people remember it when they can't connect and form a movement and work against the forgers.

Until the emergence of the internet no one was really able to connect on a broader level. We have to keep that in mind. People weren't even in touch with others from their own city, just in their own little world, listening to radio maybe.

The orphan trains might be the smoking gun of something larger going on in that time. I am sure something devastating happened that started industrialization. The story is that suddenly everyone invented awesome things and people happily moved into the cities from the poor and boring countryside, but oops, everyone got even poorer and more miserable in the cities. Something doesn't add up with the whole story of industrialization. The child labor stories always go together with it. How can the post-medieval renaissance society willfully give up their rural life in favor of slavery?

The places the orphaned children went to are the same places that had just been "freed" from the natives: Western America, Australia, Russia. They took people from Central Europe and Western America and places them into the new territories. The territories that were supposedely colonized for hundreds of years. The time up to 1900 was the last stage of this process that took, how long?, maybe 200-300 years, where they reorganized the entire world and the world was made to forget.

Can we even understand the implications that the entire globe was filled with independent kingdoms only 300 years ago?

The Orphan train topic may be one of the most important topics to gain some understanding of our recent past. I wouldn't be surprised if the church paid good money for every child a woman left at their doorstep. Incentives always work. No way those children were all from single mothers, it seems an entire industry was created and couples just produced children in the name of whatever story.
 
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dreamtime

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#7
I don't think there was a catastrophe killing the parents. Catastrophes kill all parts of the population in equal proportions, except maybe (civil) wars.

Imho for some reason the population in the cities exploded in the beginning of the 19th century, and the church or the authorities probably just said "Give us the children you cannnot feed, and we take care of them in the new lands. Oh, and here's 5 Dollar"

Orphan trains means there was an enourmous 'surplus' of children being 'produced', because the native population had to be supported also.

It seems there is some connection to some kind of catastrophe also, but it looks like many things are still unknown. Maybe the catastrophe/war happened in the areas that were newly populated.
 
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whitewave

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#8
When I was younger, there was a series of books called "The Boxcar Children". They were quite popular at the time. They were about some siblings who lived in the rail cars on their own and had adventures. I'm wanting, now, to go back and re-read those to see if there are any hidden-in-plain-sight clues in them.
Culturally reset kids would wipe out our memory of history in one generation and that looks like what happened.
 

Ice Nine

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#9
I'll never forget my dad saying once when I was a kid, this was in the 1950s, how we know nothing of what the world is really like, we live in a bubble where everything is filtered so we only know what were need to know. Or what "they" want us to know. He came to this conclusion after being over seas during WWII. I was quite young at the time and didn't ask what he meant, what made him think this way. Of course he was completely right in his assessment. He died when I was a teenager and I never talked to him about it, also my Dad and all my uncles were overseas fighting in WWII and I don't recall any of them ever talking about it. They are referred to as The Greatest Generation, they grew up during the great depression and fought in WWII, I call them the strong silent type.
I just bring this up because it made me think like @whitewave is driving at, if you have one generation that doesn't want to talk about what was happening, history in the making, then you lose all kinds of information. And then whoever is telling the story can pretty much make up whatever they want.
Culturally reset kids would be extremely easy to do. Children almost always do and believe whatever adults tell them, maybe not so much these days however. I'm glad my great great uncle helped my great great grandpa escape the orphanage.
 

Will I am

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#10
It ties a lot together for me and this thread. Great/Grandparents and What We Learn From Them
We should know more, but there are many dead ends. I am a little shocked of how little my family knows beyond their own parents.

No one wants to call their grandparents liars, but there were plenty of things it seems they did not want to talk about or have answers for.
The tradition of child labor in families is a clue, if we compare it to the cycle of abuse. As we all age and eventually become our parents.

Immigrants and orphans without roots seems like the the population you would need if you destroyed a civilization and then repopulated it. Pretending the technology and architecture was your own, but lacked the knowledge to reproduce it.
It makes you wonder what really happened to the previous civilization, was it a reset, an event or maybe something we haven't touched on yet.
This is the ultimate puzzle to solve.
 

Ishtar

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#11
When I was younger, there was a series of books called "The Boxcar Children". They were quite popular at the time. They were about some siblings who lived in the rail cars on their own and had adventures. I'm wanting, now, to go back and re-read those to see if there are any hidden-in-plain-sight clues in them.
Culturally reset kids would wipe out our memory of history in one generation and that looks like what happened.
Try to find a first edition if you want to do research...several of these popular children’s series (also Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys) are rewritten for each generation to be more modern
 

WildFire2000

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#12
From my memory of the few Boxcar Children I read, they were a family of 4 kids who were orphans. They ran from something and ended up on their own, where at the end of the first book, found an abandoned red railcar that they made into their home. ... and that's the limit of my recollection, it's been years since I even thought of the books, though, in my child mind it was 'modern', nothing set way back in the past. It was the 70' or 80's era that the book took place, if I remember correctly.

Anyway, this is crazy, never really thought about the number of kids and all of that even though I really like the Disney musical Newsies. (the Movie, they changed the music too much for the Broadway show). It was about the 1890's, I think, and dealt with Child Labor, and 90% of the kids in the movie were supposed to be orphans from New York. It's nuts. What happened to the parents? Cowboy, the main character, wanted to go to Santa Fe, which is, of course, out west to the new territory of New Mexico, and he lied and told everyone that's where his parents went. Amazing, as usual KD.
 

rafalnowicki

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#13
I was thinking about those children for a long time and could not figure out how did it happen. Until I watched "Age of disclosure" and his movie "RE-SET", where there is a short information about possible cannibalism in 18xx. And everything started to fall into place. I watched Martin Liedke depicting many old books with pictures which show how cannibalism looked like. And this might be the reason why 18xx years are so mistery. It's too scary to even look at it. Let's think a while about that. In tough situations, people are forced to do evil things like eating other people. We have many examples of it also in XX century like Holodomor. If there were the Global Reset in the first half of 18xx people would be forced to do it in some scale. Children would not be excluded from that. See "The Road" movie, where a father is trying to save his son to become somebody's dinner. But in this situation, we have lots of children and no parents. Children on survived pictures look in most cases traumatized and sad. I suspect the worst. I suspect there was an institutionalized cannibalism run by elites to feed themselves until earth started to grow plant food. I suspect that even when agriculture was reestablished they did not want to change their diet so easily. The mass scale of this is unimaginable. Check Catacombs of Paris where we have about 2 millions of cooked people and nicely decorated into walls. Catacombs (overground/underground) can be found in all places all over the world. Those are places where possibly those children became orphans. Places where their parents can be found.

RE-SET movie on YT
 

dreamtime

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#15
In tough situations, people are forced to do evil things like eating other people. We have many examples of it also in XX century like Holodomor.
Quote about Holodomor:

Survival was a moral as well as a physical struggle. A woman doctor wrote to a friend in June 1933 that she had not yet become a cannibal, but was "not sure that I shall not be one by the time my letter reaches you." The good people died first. Those who refused to steal or to prostitute themselves died. Those who gave food to others died. Those who refused to eat corpses died. Those who refused to kill their fellow man died. Parents who resisted cannibalism died before their children did.​

Bloodlands

Sometimes I think there's an evolutionary pressure throughout history that favors psychopaths, which means that people with morals are forced out of the gene pool, due to certain events like Holodomor. Traumatic events are able to squeeze good people out of a society within a single generations, which could be an explanation for rapid change of society from good to evil.

It's still happening today, hundreds of thousands of good people dying due to their lack of adjustment to this society, be it from suicide, disease or chronic stress, it's happening on a slower pace then during war time, but it's happening.

Let's say a society goes through something like the Time of Troubles (Russian famine of 1601-03) or the Reformation Wars (and the Witch Trials). If there were 20% good people, 60% indifferent people and 20% bad people before, afterwards there may only be 5% good people left. That would drastically change the entire way society is organized, because there is no one left to oppose the evil systems of power. In that way we have really no idea how our world looked like before multiple rounds of catastrophic times, because the influence of good people decreases each time. What once was maybe simply a minority opinion or view towards life suddenly becomes the dominant force. The memory and history of those who held different views dies with them. We know that those in power always rewrite history, that's a fact known even to historians, but the implications are always ignored.
 
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nothingnew

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#16
People eat people even today.

To the Aghori people everything is one and it goes so far that when they wish for a nice meal, they eat dirt from the street or a rotting human corpse just in spite. They detach themselves completely from the desires of ones lower self and seek enlightenment through various rituals, including drinking blood from a human skull, cannibalism and meditation.

Are these people necessary evil? Who am I to judge?!
 

Paracelsus

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#18
My great-grandpappy was orphaned in 1912 and his mother sent him and his brother back east to stay with family in Chicago. Being that they were also poor Irish, they couldn't afford to take them in and they both wound up on the street. My great grandfathers' age at the time... 6!

I've been told the full sad details of the story by my great-aunt. The cause of my great grandfather being orphaned was my great-great grandfathers' death at age 42. His mother was still very much alive, and chose to take care of his sister and another brother while sending him away with another sibling. Once they arrived in South-Side Chicago they found similarly poor family and wound up on the street, then eventually an orphanage.

My grandfather never spoke fondly of his childhood memories of his father. His father, my great-grandfather Eddie was a hard man with a volcanic temper. He loved his children, but could barely provide for them and they grew up in very austere circumstances too, although not nearly as grim. What my grandfather did say about my great-grandpa Eddie was that he was a great boxer during his early days and when he went into the Navy. Although, that's not remarkable for my family, every male has either become a boxer or martial artist, myself included.

If my great grandpa had been born a few years earlier he would have undoubtedly been on an orphan train.
 

whitewave

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#19
Parents will generally do anything, including dying, for their children but I don't know if that's always the case. When I was about 2 years old my grandfather was carrying me in one arm and a sack of groceries in the other. I must've fidgeted or something and he dropped me and I broke my arm. When my grandmother asked him why he didn't drop the groceries instead he said, "groceries are harder to come by than kids". :) I think in larger families people just assumed that not all of the litter would make it and somewhat accepted that. Not that they didn't value their kids or mourn their loss but I think they expected to lose a few along the way. With all the orphans and foundlings we see in the pictures and read about, a lot of parents must've been willing to sacrifice themselves to ensure their children's survival. Even if their history is lost, at least they're alive.
 

Paracelsus

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#20
Parents will generally do anything, including dying, for their children but I don't know if that's always the case. When I was about 2 years old my grandfather was carrying me in one arm and a sack of groceries in the other. I must've fidgeted or something and he dropped me and I broke my arm. When my grandmother asked him why he didn't drop the groceries instead he said, "groceries are harder to come by than kids". :) I think in larger families people just assumed that not all of the litter would make it and somewhat accepted that. Not that they didn't value their kids or mourn their loss but I think they expected to lose a few along the way. With all the orphans and foundlings we see in the pictures and read about, a lot of parents must've been willing to sacrifice themselves to ensure their children's survival. Even if their history is lost, at least they're alive.
Sounds like the old Irish charm!
 
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