Hidden history in Films and Television

Yergen

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#1
We've all seen examples of the many lies propagated in our culture and history, yet we've also seen examples of that lie being revealed, but revealed in a way that gives it no legitimacy. I'd like to find more examples of this in media; TV shows and movies, Books and Comics, Plays and Theater.

Here's one that i watched recently after someone recommended it:

theGoldenCompas.jpg

The Golden Compass
It deals with ideas about parallel worlds, nature of souls, organized criminal conspiracies and most importantly the harvest of human beings.

At the moment i'm curious if anyone knows examples of this 'revealing' about the World Expositions and the Global Architecture phenomenon?
 

KorbenDallas

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#2
Yup, quite a few movies make you scratch your head. Matrix is obviously one of those, and then we have The Truman Show, The 13th Floor and so on.

I've never watched this Compass one. What do they say about harvesting in there?
 
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Yergen

Yergen

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#3
I've never watched this Compass one. What do they say about harvesting in there?
The climax of the movie reveals that a sinister group(the Church) are trying to sever the link between human beings and their souls, this testing is being done on children. Once the procedure is complete the child becomes catatonic, not capable of higher functioning anymore. It's not explicitly stated that they harvest these 'souls' but it's not a far leap to call the outcome that given what we know is happening irl.
 

dreamtime

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#6
One topic I'm often thinking about what the significance is that certain movies strike a chord in the collective consciousness, or unconsciousness.

There are the obvious movies that directly reveal truth to those who are able to see it, like KD mentioned. Then there are these movies that are basically engrained into our collective subconsciousness, like Avatar, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Jurassic Park, Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean, etc.

(I'm not up to date with any of the prominent movies after 2012, I can't even watch them, they feel like blatant cultural propaganda.)

I think there's something about experiencing these illusionary worlds that has been lost, something that would ideally be a part of the real world. Of course they often use similar patterns like Campbells hero's journey that make the stories extremely attractive, because they simulate this journey, minus the real work that would be necessary to walk the path. And also often it's just the lack of a meaningful life that attracts people to these illusionary worlds, lack of adventure and a meaningful society. But maybe there's more to it.

The war of good vs evil would be one element to look at. Something feels disbalanced in our world, and the good guys are always needed so people can make a conscious decision where they want to stand, and without good it's hard to discern evil. Was this "good vs. evil" thing a primary element of our own story in a once distant past? (There's the idea in Caceys' work that this was indeed the case in "Atlantis") Why would we resonate so much with this polarity if it wasn't the case?

When you look at Harry Potter people also love the idea of a deeper hidden reality beyond the normal world. I think the Harry Potter plot comes straight out of another dimension, when you look at the way it was written by a woman that never before wrote, and she just wrote it down like in a trance. She once said she had basically the complete story laid out before writing a single word. She just got access to this, wherever she got it from. It's channeled material, just like the work of Philip K. Dick.

Then there's also the medieval world of Game of Thrones, I can't believe how many people are addicted to this show. It's basically a dark Machiavellian world where people are betraying and plotting against and killing each other all the time, and everything else is just a background noise to give the plot a variety. I got sick of it after the first episode. One thing I found interesting that the author who is well versed in medieval history includes the Tartarians as the "free cities" and "hordes in the east beyond the free cities".

Maybe all of these illusionary worlds are merely a collective dream about our ancient past, a way of coping with how much has been taken away from us, as we can't have the capacities of mourning something we don't even remember.

When you look at the old paintings from our own ancestors, what do you feel? Do we really know what they were up to? Do you know that the church destroyed all evidence of magic? This happened in our own timeline, not in a movie.

serveimage.jpg
 
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Radal16

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#8
Captain America: The Winter Soldier was basically the NWO conspiracy in movie form.
 

mythstifieD

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#9
not a film (as far as I know) but a prominent book:

Ada written in 1959.

It almost sounds like disclosure hidden in a novel:

The story takes place in the late nineteenth century on what appears to be an alternative history of Earth, which is there called Demonia or Antiterra. Antiterra has the same geography and a largely similar history to that of Earth; however, it is crucially different at various points. For example, the United States includes all of the Americas(which were discovered by African navigators). But it was also settled extensively by Russians, so that what we know as western Canada is a Russian-speaking province called "Estoty", and eastern Canada a French-speaking province called "Canady". Russian, English, and French are all in use in North America. The territory which belongs to Russia in our world, and much of Asia, is part of an empire called Tartary, while the word "Russia" is simply a "quaint synonym" for Estoty. The British Empire, which includes most or all of Europe and Africa, is ruled (in the nineteenth century) by a King Victor. Aristocracy is still widespread, but some technology has advanced well into twentieth-century forms. Electricity, however, has been banned since almost the time of its discovery following an event referred to as "the L-disaster". Airplanes and cars exist, but television and telephones do not, their functions served by similar devices powered by water. The setting is thus a complex mixture of Russia and America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

The belief in a "twin" world, Terra, is widespread on Antiterra as a sort of fringe religion or mass hallucination. (The name "Antiterra" may be a back-formation from this; the planet is "really" called "Demonia".) One of Van's early specialties as a psychologist is researching and working with people who believe that they are somehow in contact with Terra. Terra's alleged history, so far as he states it, appears to be that of our world: that is, the characters in the novel dream, or hallucinate, about the real world.
 

KorbenDallas

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#10
Nabokov's Ada is on my to-read list. Major thanks to @mythstifieD for the pointers.

Another interesting book is: The Year 4338: Petersburg Letters. It was written in 1835 by Vladimir Odoevsky.
The world described in Odoevsky's work is in some respects similar to the 21st century and yet differs significantly from the present we currently encounter. Some of the technological advances included in the Petersburg Letters are air and space travel, the telephone, artificially controlled climates and the ability to photocopy.
 

Dirigible

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#11
I'll add again a fascinating piece of SciFi read a while back... About extra dimensional beings that invaded a highly develop and super technological earth... It took over 5 centuries for them to pound us back into near stone age and destroy the majority of our infrastructure and only about 20,000 people were left. The surviving humans ended up calling these beings demons.

Anyway, one person finds some of the "ancient technology" and rescues a sizeable group of humans and escapes to a deserted island, which they proceed to name Atlantis...

Called the Knighthood, Atlantis Rising Book 1 by Evan Currie.
 
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Yergen

Yergen

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#12
ICalled the Knighthood, Atlantis Rising Book 1 by Evan Currie.
What a coincidence, I've been reading his fanfiction work for years, never knew there was anything beyond that.
Thanks a lot, I'll add this to my pile of reading!
 

Falkes

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#13
I always felt there was some hidden knowledge in Stephen King's Dark Tower series. About how there are many "Earths" layered over each other and events in one world , like ripples in the water after a stone is dropped, effect the other "Earths" as well.
 

BStankman

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#14
Science fiction. Because of all the predictive programming and the way it can comment on the current society with less scrutiny.

Hunger Games. Where an out of touch parasitical ruling class district has totalitarian control over the other backwards districts. Toiling away as a slave and forced to sacrifice their own children to the system. Wasn’t a big fan of every teenage girl’s worst fantasy of having to choose between 2 boys though.

Or the Black Mirror episode Nosedive, where your social media score controls you Orwell style. 100% real now in China. Social credit.

If we are bringing in literature. Orwell's 1984 tells us the process of fabricating history (and much more predictive programming). It appears he knew he was dying in when written in 1949. A death bed confession?

‘As soon as all the corrections which happened to be necessary in any particular number of the Times
had been assembled and collated, that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed and the
corrected copy placed on the files in its stead. This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to
newspapers, but to books, periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sound tracks, cartoons, photographs
– to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold any political or ideological
significance. Day by day and almost minute by minute the past was brought up to date. All history was a
palimpsest, scraped clean and reinscribed exactly as often as was necessary. In no case would it have been
possible, once the deed was done, to prove that any falsification had taken place’
 
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flameto

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#17
Mason_n_dixon.jpg

The novel's scope takes in aspects of established Colonial American history including the call of the West, the histories of women, North Americans, and slaves, plus excursions into geomancy, Deism, a hollow Earth, and — perhaps — alien abduction. The novel also contains philosophical discussions and parables of automata/robots, the after-life, the eleven days lost to the Gregorian calendar, slavery, feng shui and others. George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Nevil Maskelyne, Samuel Johnson, Thomas Jefferson, and John Harrison's marine chronometer all make appearances. Pynchon provides an intricate conspiracy theoryinvolving Jesuits and their Chinese converts, which may or may not be occurring within the nested and ultimately inexact narrative structure.

" ... Who claims Truth, Truth abandons. History is hir'd, or coerc'd, only in Interests that must ever prove base. She is too innocent, to be left within the reach of anyone in Power,—who need but touch her, and all her Credit is in the instant vanish'd, as if it had never been. She needs rather to be tended lovingly and honorably by fabulists and counterfeiters, Ballad-Mongers and Cranks of ev'ry Radius, Masters of Disguise to provide her the Costume, Toilette, and Bearing, and Speech nimble enough to keep her beyond the Desires, or even the Curiosity, of Government... "
Mason & Dixon (p. 350)
I haven't read this but it seems like it might be relevant. Pynchon is supposed to be a descendant of New England aristocracy. Maybe he knows some things.

William Pynchon (October 11, 1590 – October 29, 1662) was an English colonist and fur trader in North America best known as the founder of Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. He was also a colonial treasurer, original patentee of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the iconoclastic author of the New World's first banned book.
 

whitewave

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#18
Oh great! Now I have a whole new list of books to read. I'll never get caught up at this rate. (But thanks everyone for the suggestions; I AM looking forward to reading these.)
 

BlackFlag

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#19
Jupiter Ascending. Earth as a farm with humans as cattle (and the horrible evil aliens are humans!).
 
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