Jesuitenberg: Why Are There Underground Jesuit Caves in Europe Filled with Egyptian and Islamic Art?

Apollyon

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#1
It's said that the Jesuits are the military wing of the catholic church a veritable holy army if you will. What sort of activity would these forces engage in? Fabrication? Falsification? Forgery? Espionage? The "unofficial" oath is particularly spine tingling, search for it yourself as it's certainly contested and make up your own mind. the official motto is no less disconcerting, it states Ad maiorem Dei gloriam. Meaning "To the greater glory of God." In plain english it means the ends justifies the means... but what are the ends?

Here is a link with many more images and some healthy speculation by the author

Jezuietenberg1.jpg

I may not even think much of this if this was an isolated incident, but I very much doubt that it is. When the most prominent traditional Japanese art was made by Jesuit Giuseppe Castiglione you have to start asking "is this the only cave of this kind?" or just the only one we know about? Maybe thats why we see virtually no evolution in art styles from Japan over a span of 1000 years. It's all just forgeries made at the same time maybe.

1173px-Emperor_Ninkō.jpg 1206px-Emperor_Montoku.jpg

left: Emperor Ninkō 1817 AD right: Emperor Montoku 850 AD

I'm sure this is just a coincidence as well

Jesuïtes_de_Sarrià_-_ad_maiorem_Dei_gloriam.jpg SI large bw.jpg
 
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CyborgNinja

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#3
If this cave isn't proof positive of a whole sale effort by Jesuits to forge entire histories worth of manuscripts and other art pieces then I just can't help people.

The jesuits were positioned perfectly to conduct these forgeries and then to insert them into the nation's they were occupying. Japan is a perfect example.

These are sick, sick individuals who will stop at nothing to control peoples perceptions.
 

Paracelsus

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#6
What actually is known about the Jesuit order?

According to Wikipedia (a dubious source), they were founded in 1540 by Íñigo López de Loyola. His biography reads like most noblemen of the time; drinking, dueling, chasing tail, fighting for more powerful relatives. Then, tragedy strikes and he catches a cannonball to the legs and goes into seclusion to heal. During this time he reads about St. Ludolph, and St. Francis of Assisi and undergoes a deep spiritual conversion. Based on this, everything seems above board with his tale of being a reformed libertine and shit-kicker.

But then you get the Secreta Monita in 1612:
Secreta monita Societatis Jesu. The secret counsels of the Society of Jesus, in Latin and English. The Latin being the text used in former editions: the English, a new and more literal version : Breckinridge, Robert J. (Robert Jefferson), 1800-1871 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Which reads much like the Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion:
Protocols of Zion : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

And, Silent Weapons For Quiet Wars:
Silent Weapons For Quiet Wars : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Most certainly I'd say the Jesuits and the Papacy had/has the knowledge, infrastructure, and resources to construct history. Anyone who'd ask "to what end?" I'd say "to what end does power serve?"

You have the ability to control what and how people think about the nature of reality. I personally had no idea about this interesting fact. St. Dominic the founder of the Dominican Order is actually the patron saint of astronomers. Which, during his life would have have been the ancient art of astrology and not engendered the ridicule it does today. These vignettes, ironies, and synchronicities weave through all of our lives.

I'd say what we don't know about the Jesuits fills more volumes than what we do.
 

kentucky

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#7
As it seems, this whole history-erasing operation is worldwide and still continually going on.
To your point, and heartbreakingly so, the National Museum of Brazil was just set aflame and who knows what history had been taken away or obfuscated from us through that act. Rio De Janeiro and its surrounding areas were an historical Jesuit stronghold before their expulsion, although their presence had clearly returned in the 20th century. The Jesuits surely had much to gain or to hide from such artifacts being removed from the public record.

I'd love to see a new thread on this but digress from now, as not to derail from the current thread.
 

PrincepAugus

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#8
To your point, and heartbreakingly so, the National Museum of Brazil was just set aflame and who knows what history had been taken away or obfuscated from us through that act. Rio De Janeiro and its surrounding areas were an historical Jesuit stronghold before their expulsion, although their presence had clearly returned in the 20th century. The Jesuits surely had much to gain or to hide from such artifacts being removed from the public record.

I'd love to see a new thread on this but digress from now, as not to derail from the current thread.
We do have a thread for that: Fire destroys 200 year old National Museum of Brazil
 

asatiger1966

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#10
Thank you. Jesuits are a group we should probably be paying a much closer attention to.

I happen to think that they singlehandedly fabricated thousands of years of the non-existent history of China.
I have a large number of history books. Many times the Jesuits inserted themselves into many countries under false intentions. you might like this inconspicuous nugget.

[Type message here]

The Pelican
History of the world, J.M. Roberts, 1976
Note: This part concerns the Chinese Ming Dynasty
Under the Ming, too, came first Europeans to seek more than a voyage of trade or discovery. In 1557 Portuguese established themselves at Macao. They had little to offer which China wanted, except silver, but missionaries followed and the official tolerance of Confucian tradition gave them opportunities they successfully exploited. They became influential at the Ming court and in the seventeenth century Chinese officials began to feel alarmed and ordered them back to Macao. Besides the mechanical clocks which the missionaries added to the imperial collections and the scientific and cosmographical learning with which they interested Chinese intellectuals, they had other valuable skills. The correction of the Chinese calendar, which one Jesuit carried out, was of great importance, for the authenticity of the emperors sacrifices depended on accurate dating. From the Jesuits the Chinese learnt also to cast heavy cannon, another useful art.

Page 433.
 
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