Russia: 1952 Volga–Don Shipping Canal vs. 1649 Canalis

KorbenDallas

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#1
There is this Volga-Don canal in Russia. It connects the Volga river (discharges into the Caspian Sea) with the Don river (discharges into Sea of Azov). It was officially built between 1948 and 1952. Technically the construction started before 1941, but it was interrupted by the Second World War. The length of the waterway is 101 km (63 mi), 45 km (28 mi) through rivers and reservoirs.

Canal History
  • After capturing Azov in 1696, Peter the Great decided to build the canal, but, because of a lack of resources and other problems, this attempt was abandoned in 1701 without success. In 1701, he initiated a second attempt. Instead of connecting the lower course of the Don with the lower course of the Volga near the present canal, the Ivanovsky Canal connected the upper course of the Don in what is now Tula Oblast.
  • Between 1702 and 1707, twenty-four locks were constructed, and, in 1707, about 300 ships passed the canal under remarkably difficult navigation conditions. In 1709 due to financial difficulties caused by the Great Northern War, the project was halted. In 1711, under terms of the Treaty of the Pruth, Russia left Azov and Peter the Great lost all interest in the canal, which was abandoned and fell into ruin. Over time, other projects for connecting the two rivers were proposed, but none was attempted.
  • This 1707 canal was located in the vicinity of the city of Yepifan. That is approximately 450 miles North-West from the modern canal.
Modern Canal
volga_don_canal.jpg


1.1 millions Workers
  • The actual construction of today's Volga–Don Canal, began prior to the Second World War, which would interrupt the process. Construction works continued from 1948 to 1952; navigation was opened 1 June 1952.
  • The canal and its facilities were built by about 900,000 workers including some 100,000 German POWs and 100,000 prisoners.
  • Upon completion, the Volga–Don Canal became an important link of the Unified Deep Water Transportation System of the European part of the USSR.
volga_don_canal_3.jpg


Satellite Image
Volga–Don_Canal.jpg

17-18th Century Canal
If in the 1940s/1950s it took our current civilization at least 4 years and 1,100,000 workers to complete this 63 mile long canal. Technically, if you zoom in at the today's Volga-Don canal, you will see that it incorporates quite a few pre-existing bodies of water. The actual portion of the Volga-Don passage canal they had to dig (by 1952) was 35 miles long.

I'm wondering how many workers they had to employ some time around 1649 to connect Volga and Don.

17-18th century canal route
volga_don_canal_russia_3.jpg

Sources:
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KD: It does appear that those 18th century builders incorporated a river into this canal. May be it was done way before the 17th century by more ancient workers, I do not know. I also do not know what happened to this canal. (mud flood, deliberate destruction?)
  • What I do know: it does not appear that this 1649 (at least) canal was mentioned in the official Wiki narrative.
    • May be a portion of the old canal was incorporated into the new one.
    • Also, landscape keeps on changing, which suggests a global event.
 
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#2
It is mentioned in Russian history book and there were even writings inspired by it. Here is Google translation from Russian wiki:
Ivanovsky canal

I hope it helps. Personally I don't see anything unusual that in 1950's there were 1.1 mln workers used. First it was a much larger and more modern effort demanding more people. Second it was time when ridiculously large amount of people were used for everything in USSR as most of it was actually slave labour by political prisoners of the time. The official statistics of how many people were working for the common Communistic future had to impress rival countries. "Look how many people we have working for our goal!" It was the rhetoric of the time. And I'm not sure the statistics is actually correct. We can't be sure about it as many numbers in Soviet Union were made up just to impress the political bosses in the Party.
  • The construction of the canal began in 1702 after procurement of materials necessary for it. It was supposed to connect the rivers Upu and Shat in the region of cleared silt and peat and the deepened Ivan-lake (hence the name of the canal), and through them the rivers Volga and Don. 35 thousand peasants from neighboring villages were collected for laying the canal, and later, after the first victories during the Northern War , captured Swedes also took part in laying the canal.
  • To date, the channel is almost completely destroyed. At the beginning of the 20th century, some canal constructions still existed. Historical descriptions mention the existence of remnants of the canal at a later time. The historian A. I. Milovidov, in a paper published in 1930, mentions the use of the remains of canal constructions by local people as building materials.
  • The theme of the construction of the Ivanovsky Canal was embodied in the works of the talented Russian writer Andrei Platonov (1899-1951) in his story Epiphany Gateways (written in 1926 in Tambov and first published in the eponymous collection in 1927).
  • From August 27 to August 30, 2012, a comprehensive expedition to study the waterways of Russia (KEIWP) was held, organized by the Institute of the History of Natural Science and Technology . S.I. Vavilova RAS. The expedition carried out a historical and scientific study of the remains of the Ivanovo water system and the ecological, hydrological and hydrochemical study of the Nepryadva River (the right tributary of the Don River, with a source in the Volov Lake region ). The work was carried out under the leadership of the candidate of historical sciences, deputy. Director of Scientific Work of the Museum-Reserve "Kulikovo Field" A. N. Naumov.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#3
It's not what they accomplished by 1952, it's what was done by 1649. Had to use google translate to obtain some additional info. Russian Wikipedia Canal page definitely has more info on this canal. And it says in there:
  • The first attempt to connect the Volga and the Don in the place of their closest approach is attributed by historians to the middle of the XVI century. In 1569, the Turkish Sultan Selim II, famous for his march on Astrakhan, sent 22,000 soldiers up the Don River in order to dig a canal between two rivers. However, just a month later, the Turks retreated "with great abuse", stating, according to the chroniclers, that "even the entire Turkish people cannot do anything here for 100 years."
Yet we can clearly see, especially on the 1704 detailed map, that the canal did exist. If it took us 1.1 mil workers and heavy equipment in 1952, how did they pull it off by at least 1649? And if Turks did not do it, who did?

1704 - Volga_don-Canal_1.jpg
 
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#4
My point was that it maybe irrelevant to compare the used workforce of modern canal and Ivanovsky canal.
There could be many reasons why Turks couldn't complete their project. We can't know for sure as always with history. We also can't be sure the 18th century old map is a real map and not the project of the canal which cartographers thought was built already. But something went wrong and plans were abandoned. But many poeple could still think it went according to plan. So only ruins of the attempt remained for example. We should understand how difficult it was to obtain any information about other parts of the world at that time, there were no fast ways to get it. Many cartographers had to make assumptions when drawing maps and to rely on the word of so called 'travelers'. Whom most of the time were just making things up.
And something we should know about Turks and Ottoman Empire is that everyone tried their best to impress the Sultan and gain the position in his eyes. It happened in most Empires and it happens now - people lie about things done. Time passes and, voir la - we sit here and discuss possibly non-existent canal. :)
 
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Paracelsus

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#6
Just like KD with the Tatarians, I'll posit technology similar to what John Worrell Keely used for the construction of these canals. The Compound Liberator, or Compound Disentegrator could easily "move" that much soil, and certainly without millions of workers and years required to do so. The Tatarian architecture alone is abundant proof that they used Etheric/Aetheric power. That beautiful and ornate lock would never have been built by the U.S.S.R., functional and utilitarian was the extent of their artistry.

Just like the strip-malls of the U.S., pleasing and unique architecture crafted out of quality building materials is a staggering anomaly. You either get form or function, not both.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#7
We should understand how difficult it was to obtain any information about other parts of the world at that time, there were no fast ways to get it. Many cartographers had to make assumptions when drawing maps and to rely on the word of so called 'travelers'. Whom most of the time were just making things up.
Will respectfully disagree. This is what got us where we are at in first place. Sounds in line with the official Pyramids building position. If the narrative says they only had copper chisels, sleds and slaves, than that’s what they used to build them Pyramids. Another one is the Big Bang theory. Both are non verifiable and based on pure speculation, if not intentional deceit.

We are allowed to play with these semi professional copies of the actual maps, which are being kept by the group we struggle to identify. The copies which appear to have been allowed to be produced through athorized informational injection.

Meanwhile, simultaneously with often childish picture maps, those 18th, and even 16th century cartographers were able to produce maps mentioned, and shown in the below thread.
Just like they said in the famous movie:
"All right, Beatrice, there was no alien. The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus." - Kay, MIB.
That’s what they tell us. It was difficult to obtain information, cartographers were making stuff up and ruin artists had vivid but sick dystopian imagination.

I’m just grateful that not everything got destroyed, and some things did slip through the cracks of censorship. These slipped things allow for a glimpse of the real picture.
My point was that it maybe irrelevant to compare the used workforce of modern canal and Ivanovsky canal.
This canal is not the Ivanovsky one. Ivanovsky was like 450 miles North West From the one on the above maps. But regardless of the location, we should be comparing things. Events do not exist in isolation. There were other things, at leat officially, done simultaneously. At some point when work force and population don’t match those who pay attention will notice certain clues.
 

Magnetic

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#8
1,115 miles long The Grand Canal of China -not possible.

363 miles long Erie Canal - Wikipedia completed in 1825 - not possible.

The entire earth is covered with silted in canals and star forts overdue for routine maintenance.
The catastrophe that destroyed Siberian cities and their star forts was a flood event along with electrical discharges that made the shallow circular lakes filled with salt water from the arctic seas that roiled over the area of Siberia. Star forts are only found at the southern edges of Siberia where it bumps up against the mountains there, so the waters must have gushed into the canal area and filled it with debris as it emptied into the Azov and Caspian seas and were probably damaged as well as being buried. I have come to think that the canals were built by giants who had giant technics that have not been discovered because they were destroyed by the small peoples(us!). Their accomplishments show a high degree of skill and planning with the ability to make what they made aesthetically pleasing that our present day civilization can not touch. They made great buildings, aqueducts, roads, canals and cities which we admire today. Hats off to this superior civilization!
 
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