Something is very fishy with the tides

Anonymous

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#1
Tides are supposed to be influenced by the moon, right? Look at this map of tidal amplitude and tell me the moon hypothesis makes any sense. The purple areas have a tidal amplitude of zero, meaning NO TIDES. The entire Sea of Japan has almost no tides. How can this be possible?

tidal-meme-1.jpg

Mainstream science writes this off very poorly by explaining these areas are "amphidromic points" - the midpoints of a wave in a basin. They conveniently never explain the "amphidromic point" between the islands of New Zealand, which is a high point NOT a basin at all.

tecplot_animation_new_zealand.gif

Watch the high tides (red) and low tides (blue) revolve around New Zealand like a magnet. How is this explained by the Lunar hypothesis? Does the moon revolve around New Zealand?

More tidal deadzones in America:

florida panhandle tides.png

I suspect these amphidromic points, or Tidal Nodes, are the SOURCE of tides, rather than their result.

amp_lunaire.gif CookCotidal.png yes_K1_TOPEX.gif

above: notice the sea of Japan (where there are no tides), has been whited out so you can't see it. Why? So that you won't ask weird questions?


Here's a crazy rabbit hole: Are there tides on inland bodies of water?

It turns out there are, but only when those bodies are SALTY. There are NO tides on freshwater bodies. And it appears that the saltier the body, the higher the tidal amplitude. There are NO tides in the great lakes (fresh) but observed tides in the dead sea, great salt lake, caspian sea, baltic and black seas.

inland sea tides.jpg

The Caspian sea is especiall interesting, because half of it is fresh and half of it is salty. The graphic shows no tides on the northern part of the sea, where the fresh water is.

There is much more research to be done on tides, as they are an extremely complex subject with many "tidal constituents" and schedules.

Figure 12 M2 plot.png
 

KorbenDallas

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#2
Scientific BS on the freshwater tides is that they exist, but they are invisible due to them tides actually being something like huge wave bodies dependent on the total amounts of water. People are buying this of course, because they have no reason to question it.

I think tides have the direct correlation with the inside Earth water circulation. I do not know where the drain is, but the faucet in my opinion is here.

8A04CA45-F4BC-4372-A487-02A12D1F2A2B.jpeg
 

dreamtime

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#4
Scientific BS on the freshwater tides is that they exist, but they are invisible due to them tides actually being something like huge wave bodies dependent on the total amounts of water. People are buying this of course, because they have no reason to question it.

I think tides have the direct correlation with the inside Earth water circulation. I do not know where the drain is, but the faucet in my opinion is here.

It was reported on this map by Mercator I think that the water actually flows inwards, which surprised the guy who wrote about Meractor and his map, because it looks as if the water comes out of the pole. (I think that was posted on this forum somewhere, but I'm not sure). This in line with the guy who supposedly traveled there together with his father.
 
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#5
For the new Zealand question, imagine the moon over western Australia. Gravity will pull the water that way resulting in a pile up on the eastern side of nz and a depression on the western side(as the water is being pulles toward Australia. The point between the islands is where the pile up runs to the depression. I imaging the currents there are fairly high.

When the moon is over nz(which it does do), that is the point in the gif when the water is all colored green
 
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CyborgNinja

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#7
I’m wondering here. If the gravitational pull of the Moon was strong enough to attract these huge amounts of water. Wouldn’t you be able to jump up higher during high tides assisted by the same gravitational pull? :)
No gravity is magic. It's powerful enough to keep all the oceans water pinned to the earth's surface but weak enough that you can break its force with a tiny magnet.
 

BStankman

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#8
How can the moon have gravity with no mass? It is a one sided two dimensional object.
 
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#10
Kudos to this research. I took home two main points on tides I didn't know about - 1. saltwater only pretty much and 2. tide strengths are very varied and localised with the NZ one being rotational.

I may have some insight to the saltwater problem.

Seawater apparantly is a much better conductor of electricity than freshwater due to the dissolved sodium and chlorine ions. They say it is about a million times more conductive.

Deionised water by its nature has very few ions. Its conductivity is about 5.5μS/m. Sea water has a relatively large number of Sodium and Chloride ions and has a conductivity of around 5S/m. This is because the Sodium Chloride salt dissociates into ions. Hence sea water is about a million times more conductive than fresh water.
Why is seawater a better conductor of electricity than water from a freshwater lake? | Socratic

So I strongly suspect electromagnetism or "charge" aka electrostatics is involved here.

Hope that helps.
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I have a further insight as to the tide strength variations in the world. Looking at the above tide map I noticed the strongest (red) tides to be near land mostly. The exception being the Gulf of Mexico. So I googled the depth of the Gulf of Mexico and lo and behold it is really really deep.
The Gulf's waters cover 500,000 square miles and plunge to a depth of 2,080 fathoms (more than 12,000 feet). This deepest part is Sigsbee Deep, an irregular trough more than 300 miles long, sometimes called the "Grand Canyon under the sea."
GULF OF MEXICO | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)

So we would need to research the water depths of the red orange and blue zones on the tidal maps and see if shallow water offers the strongest tides and then why.
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The answer may be because shallow water has the highest salt ion density than larger bodies.
 
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#12
Just had a look at salinity maps of the world and they don't seem to match up with the tidal map, except may be an inverse relationship in places. Even then.
Post automatically merged:

Hey welcome. Thanks for your contribution to the revisionist history genre.
Your welcome. It's ongoing.

I thought I'd be stopping at 1850AD for the maps, but no, Hudson Bay land area is still wrong even in 1850. So I have to keep going cataloguing maps until Hudson is correct. The Alaskan West coast only becomes correct in the 1820s and part of the North American West coast is only correct in around 1800AD although not absolutely 100%, just 99%. This is also around the same time Tasmania becomes an island and not a pennisula.

The earth changes are crazy. I wonder why we haven't seen any major ones in the last 100 to 150 years or so. Is the settling permanent or temporary?
 
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Anonymous

Anonymous

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#13
a few more notes about tides, since this thread has attracted some interest.

"amphidromic points" - or "tidal nodes" are found all over the world. Wikipedia reports 20 or so of them, but there are literally too many to count.

The highest concentration of tidal nodes I have found is in the polar circle. Zoom in on this picture and you will find dozens of them huddled along the coasts. Each tidal node has spidery lines coming out of it. Think of these as hands on a clock. Tides move AROUND these tidal nodes on a set schedule according to these lines.

1-s2.0-S0078323415000883-gr2.jpg


Sometimes tides revolve around these nodes clockwise, and sometimes anticlockwise. The direction they rotate has nothing to do with whether the node is located above or below the equator. Rotational chart:

1535045879741.png

Most new maps show tidal nodes as "points" - but old maps show them as regions. Some tidal nodes are large and some are small. On the following map, look at how big the nodes on Norway and the mid-pacific are, compared to how tiny the other ones are on this map. It's possible that the sea of Japan is just one giant tidal node.

PSM_V74_D539_Cotidal_lines_of_the_pacific_ocean.png tidal nodes sizes.jpg
If you want to find these maps for your area, they are called "cotidal charts"

According to the mainstream model, tides should be heaviest on the equator, but actually the opposite seems to be true. The heviest tides are found in Canada, Northern Europe, and Southern Argentina.
Screenshot_1.jpg Figure 12 M2 plot.png 1535046844953.png

 
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humanoidlord

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#14
ok that freshwater thing is a true WTF, wich i have no explanation to, maybe its because salty water is more dense?
 

Radal16

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#15
Can I ask a silly question? Why is the ocean salty? NOAA says this is why:

"Salt in the ocean comes from rocks on land.

The rain that falls on the land contains some dissolved carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. This causes the rainwater to be slightly acidic due to carbonic acid (which forms from carbon dioxide and water).

As the rain erodes the rock, acids in the rainwater break down the rock. This process creates ions, or electrically charged atomic particles. These ions are carried away in runoff to streams and rivers and, ultimately, to the ocean. Many of the dissolved ions are used by organisms in the ocean and are removed from the water. Others are not used up and are left for long periods of time where their concentrations increase over time.

Two of the most prevalant ions in seawater are chloride and sodium. Together, they make up over 90 percent of all dissolved ions in the ocean. Sodium and Chloride are 'salty.'

The concentration of salt in seawater (salinity) is about 35 parts per thousand, on average. Stated in another way, about 3.5 percent of the weight of seawater comes from the dissolved salts.

By some estimates, if the salt in the ocean could be removed and spread evenly over the Earth’s land surface it would form a layer more than 500 feet thick, about the height of a 40-story office building."


Not sure that I buy that. So if only saltwater is affected by tides, what is pulling on the chloride and sodium?
 

Glumlit

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#16
Interesting, according to a being from another timeline via the Chani Project,

"u unerstan salt and water and magnet u wil unerstan life and everything living"

That statement has always stuck in my head. I think you're on to something
 
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Anonymous

Anonymous

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#17
ok that freshwater thing is a true WTF, wich i have no explanation to, maybe its because salty water is more dense?
The official line is that the great lakes do have tides, but they just so happen to be undetectable. Then they go on to admit the great lakes are considered to be non-tidal

1535056776629.png


And yet, the dead sea (saltiest body on earth) while being far smaller, has clearly visible tides according to on the ground accounts, and photos of the salty inter-tidal zones.

1535057149704.png 1535056776629.png
 

BStankman

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#18
The official line is that the great lakes do have tides, but they just so happen to be undetectable. Then they go on to admit the great lakes are considered to be non-tidal


And yet, the dead sea (saltiest body on earth) while being far smaller, has clearly visible tides according to on the ground accounts, and photos of the salty inter-tidal zones.
That pretty much nails gravity. The salinity content is key to understanding this is a electromagnetic process.

So is the moon an elctromagnetic satellite dish? Or tides not related to the moon at all?
Curious that they are strongest near the earths center of perpetual motion.
 

Onijunbei

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#20
Can I ask a silly question? Why is the ocean salty? NOAA says this is why:

"Salt in the ocean comes from rocks on land.

The rain that falls on the land contains some dissolved carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. This causes the rainwater to be slightly acidic due to carbonic acid (which forms from carbon dioxide and water).

As the rain erodes the rock, acids in the rainwater break down the rock. This process creates ions, or electrically charged atomic particles. These ions are carried away in runoff to streams and rivers and, ultimately, to the ocean. Many of the dissolved ions are used by organisms in the ocean and are removed from the water. Others are not used up and are left for long periods of time where their concentrations increase over time.

Two of the most prevalant ions in seawater are chloride and sodium. Together, they make up over 90 percent of all dissolved ions in the ocean. Sodium and Chloride are 'salty.'

The concentration of salt in seawater (salinity) is about 35 parts per thousand, on average. Stated in another way, about 3.5 percent of the weight of seawater comes from the dissolved salts.

By some estimates, if the salt in the ocean could be removed and spread evenly over the Earth’s land surface it would form a layer more than 500 feet thick, about the height of a 40-story office building."


Not sure that I buy that. So if only saltwater is affected by tides, what is pulling on the chloride and sodium?
The ocean is salty because the earth produces a tremendous amount of salt along with water
 

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