The destruction of the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in Saint Louis

CyborgNinja

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The Louisiana Purchase was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory by the United States from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs for a total of sixty-eight million francs.

The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River (plus New Orleans); and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

3070818-AB.jpeg

Why was this land Frances' to sell in the first place?

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904

A century later the proud people of St Louis see fit to hold a spectacular celebration to commemorate 100 years since their inception. In the intervening years St Louis had gone from a small traders stop strategically positioned along a bend in the Mississippi River to a bustling cosmopolitan metropolis.

January 10, 1899 - Louisiana Purchase Convention convention of 90 delegates from states & territories of Louisiana Purchase met for purpose of considering commemoration of purchase. Delegates decided that nothing short of an international exposition would suit and decided that St. Louis, largest and most accessible city in area, would be the proper location. Missouri Historical Society also became involved in the effort.

With a stroke of their ink quills, the Delegates set in motion a course of event that over the next 5 years would see the construction of the greatest Exposition America had ever seen to date. A one George Edward Kessler was chosen as the architect.


Le Architect.

220px-George_Kessler.jpg

George Edward Kessler (July 16, 1862 – March 20, 1923)
was an American pioneer city planner and landscape architect.

Wikipedia says:
"Over the course of his forty-one year career, George E. Kessler completed over 200 projects and prepared plans for 26 communities, 26 park and boulevard systems, 49 parks, 46 estates and residences, and 26 schools. His projects can be found in 23 states, 100 cities, in places as far flung as Shanghai, New York, and Mexico City.

A popular myth says that Frederick Law Olmsted, who had died the year before the Fair, designed the park and fair grounds. There are several reasons for this confusion. First, Kessler in his twenties had worked briefly for Olmsted as a Central Park gardener. Second, Olmsted was involved with Forest Park in Queens, New York. Third, Olmsted had planned the renovations in 1897 to the Missouri Botanical Garden several blocks to the southeast of the park. Finally, Olmsted's sons advised Washington University on integrating the campus with the park across the street."

Some confusion over who was in fact responsible for the initial concept. Nothing suspicious but let us read on...

"...In 1901 the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Corporation selected prominent St. Louis architect Isaac S. Taylor as the Chairman of the Architectural Commission and Director of Works for the fair, supervising the overall design and construction. Taylor quickly appointed Emmanuel Louis Masqueray to be his Chief of Design. In the position for three years, Masqueray designed the following Fair buildings: Palace of Agriculture, the Cascades and Colonnades, Palace of Forestry, Fish, and Game, Palace of Horticulture and Palace of Transportation, all of which were widely emulated in civic projects across the United States as part of the City Beautiful movement. "

1525112881815.png

"Museum of Science and Industry, in Jackson Park, Hyde Park, Chicago IL, USA 2008"
Courtesy of Emmanuel Louis Masqueray -apparently.

Curious to find that an entire generation of grecco-roman buildings popping up around this time period. Sure multiples of the same building could have been built at this time or just as possible they already existed.

The temporary city.

U-S-History.COM has this to say about the construction of the Louisiana purchase Exposition:

"Nearly all the structures built during the fair were intended to be temporary. They were therefore constructed of staff, a mixture of plaster of Paris and hemp fibers. Following the fair, many of the structures were razed. Some of the buildings were spared, and they exist today."

OK hemp sacks and plaster, bear this in mind as this is idea of burlap sacks and plaster crops up again and again when investigating these expos which we'll cover in later articles. Now back to Kessler...
Kessler says, now this is important:

"Planning", wrote Kessler, "should be comprehensive. Even though a grand urban design could only be realized in bits and pieces, and over a long period of years, still we should always know where we are going. Each bit and piece should be understandable by reference to the great plan of which it is a part."

This was a man who built for longevity. He made no move with out firstly considering the future. "Future proofing" as they say nowadays. Are we supposed to believe that he developed an entire city out of hemp sacks and plaster? I'm no expert on building but how would that even be possible. Sure the internal frames could be wood and so on but look at the smooth finish on these walls...

5400ad403ced0.image.jpg

Look closely. those are people standing up on that building.
That's either some very strong hemp sack or some very brave people.


Build it and they will come.

October 1901 - Ground plan with original buildings approved. Four principal executive divisions were organized - Director of Exhibits, Exploitation, Works, and Concessions & Admissions. Twelve main exhibit palaces recommended for erection:

  • Education 277,945 sq. ft.
  • Art, Four Sections (Main, E, W, S)198,448
  • Liberal Arts 393,760
  • Varied Industries 447,900
  • Manufactures 588,000
  • Machinery 412,800
  • Electricity 290,200
  • Transportation 684,254
  • Agriculture 800,000
  • Horticulture 240,000
  • Forestry and Fish and Game 180,000
  • Mines and Metallurgy 395,592

card00740_fr (1).jpg

Wow looks like a whole lotta' fun.

  • Construction started: December 20, 1901
  • Construction finished: No Information.
  • Total construction time: No Information.
  • Opening: Initially July 1, 1902. Postponed until April 30, 1904
  • Closure: December 1, 1904
  • Total Expo operation time: 185 days (closed Sundays)
  • Visitors: 19,694,855
  • Ticket Cost 1904\(2018): US$0.50\(US$13.45)
  • Cost of the project in 1904\(2018): US$15,000,000\(US$403,503,095.26)
  • Profits 1904\(2018): US$6,402,308\($172,223,406.32)
  • No. Buildings constructed: over 1,500 buildings
  • Site of venue: Forest park, St Louis, 200-acre (4.9 km2)
  • Demolished: No information
  • Remaining buildings: (Palace of Fine arts - Currently St Louis Art Museum, Brookings Hall Administration building - Currently administrative offices for Washington University, “Flight Cage”(Exotic bird aviary).
78958626 (1).jpg

Palace of Fine arts

image (2).jpg

Front entrance to Palace of fine arts.
Twice as large as the Columbian expo of Chicago held 10 years earlier and 10 times larger than the one held in Buffalo the Louisiana purchase expo covers an enormous 1,270 acres (510 hectares).

4776002.jpg

Louisiana purchase exposition, Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 1904.

Forest Park, St Louis 2018.png

Forest Park, St Louis, USA. 2018.
"As many people were curious about this up and coming city, many reporters and photographers attended the World Fair to document and understand the city. What they found was nothing like anyone else could have imagined. Still as a relatively new city, the streets were buzzing with activity, with many of its citizens constantly on the "go" and the streets "crowded with activity". One observer remarked that, at this time, St. Louis had more energy in its streets than any other Northern Street did." https://en.wikipedia.org

electricity building.jpg

"Electric light, then a recent innovation, was used extensively for illumination and decoration." www.u-s-history.com
Remember this was all temporary. Hemp and plaster folks.


1904_Liberal_Arts.jpg

The exhibition is grand in scale and had a lengthy preparation, with an initial $5 million committed by the city of St. Louis through the sale of city bonds was authorized by the Missouri state legislature in April 1899.

An additional $5 million was generated through private donations by interested citizens and businesses from around Missouri, a fundraising target reached in January 1901.

locwfstlouis1904agr.jpg

The final installment of $5 million of the exposition's $15 million capitalization came in the form of earmarked funds that were part of a congressional appropriations bill passed at the end of May 1900.

The fundraising mission was aided by the active support of President of the United States William McKinley, which was won by organizers in a February 1899 White House visit.


ThePike.jpg

There were 253 exhibit buildings and structures built by the Exposition, 13 constructed by Washington University, 34 national buildings, 45 State, Territorial and Municipal buildings, 92 Philippine buildings and other structures, 74 other buildings, and 448 Concession buildings.

images (19).jpg
The fair's 1,200-acre (4.9 km2) site, designed by George Kessler, was located at the present-day grounds of Forest Park and on the campus of Washington University, and was the largest fair (in area) to date. There were over 1,500 buildings, connected by some 75 miles (121 km) of roads and walkways. It was said to be impossible to give even a hurried glance at everything in less than a week. The Palace of Agriculture alone covered some 20 acres (81,000 m2).

image (1).jpg 220px-Louisiana_Purchase_Exposition_East_Lagoon (1).jpg images (20).jpg
birds eye view st Louis.jpg
This is the end, beautiful friend.

The Louisiana purchase exposition may truly have been the most breath taking exposition ever held. Between the Baroque grecco-roman super structures and the share number of activities available on any given day its hard to imagine something like this even being possible in today's world. There is no way all these buildings would have been cost effective with such a short season of a measly 185 days, with a total cost of US$15,000,000 and a net profit of only US$6,402,308. The Expo made a loss of US$8,597,692. That's the modern day equivalent of US$231,279,688.94 as of 2018 . I cant help but feel there are important things we aren't being told about the Exposition phenomenon of the late 1800's/early 1900's.

540107e33e850.image.jpg

Gutted Missouri state pavilion. Which was destroyed by fire 19 Nov.
Two weeks before the fair closed.

There is little information to go one but soon after its closure the fair fell into disrepair and over the next few years all the structures were demolished allegedly due to their temporary nature. However there are a few remaining examples and we know from the Palace of fine arts that not all the structures were false. This building is clearly stone and we can see this today. But I could have told you that from looking at the period photos. Are we supposed to believe that these other clearly stone buildings were all made from paper mache and potato bags?



Yup. It's stone.
Then.
2b5b75c87d8063379124fa153bbee314.jpg images (21).jpg
You can only read so much from a photograph
but does this look temporary to you?

Now.
Fine arts basin gutted.png fine arts museum basin.png
Even If it was all just temporary surely that was better than this,
why not just build it all again but this time
not out of bean bags and bubble gum?

Was there a large scale conspiracy conducted by unknown persons to masquerade previously established cities and townships of an earlier culture as merely temporary show ground attractions? Was this facade then used to justify the demolition of these cities and the gradual erasing of its population and their achievements from our history books?

c6bd789d80164e07b9147b4952658b28.jpg Celebrating a century's advance, boat parade passing Electricity Bldg., World's Fair St. Louis...jpg
Louisiana_Purchase_Exposition_St._Louis_1904.jpg 3241df227e4e4d142c243d9480a9878e.jpg image.jpg image (1).jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

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#3
Insane. Two building remain standing out of 1,500. Plaster Exposition, lol. Does that mean that they planned to leave those two building standing from the very beginning, and used permanent building materials?

We have a definite pattern here of this bizarre expensive superfast construction, followed by a short operational period, after which everything gets annihilated.

Multiple expositions follow the same path. This is definitely to be investigated.
 

humanoidlord

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#4
Insane. Two building remain standing out of 1,500. Plaster Exposition, lol. Does that mean that they planned to leave those two building standing from the very beginning, and used permanent building materials?

We have a definite pattern here of this bizarre expensive superfast construction, followed by a short operational period, after which everything gets annihilated.

Multiple expositions follow the same path. This is definitely to be investigated.
maybe they werent even built for the exposition to start with, the exposition was an excuse to anninhlate everthing
 
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CyborgNinja

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#5
The granduer of it all is just jaw dropping. Just look at the elaborate statues. Who were these master craftsmen? Is this the level of skill you'd expect from general labourers of the 1800's?

If so, then Missouri definately got their monies worth when they hired these guys. I'd imagine the public were outraged when the place was torn down but you don't get to hear those stories now do you.
 

in cahoots

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#6
so-called "staffing" has no original sources on Wikipedia and is referenced ONLY for use in World's Fair construction.

Huh.

edit: Staff (building material)

"Among other things, the Fair showcased technological innovation as well as some of the first 'ethnographic displays,' in which people from other countries were placed on view for Fair visitors."

A people zoo?

Reasons for postponement were the need to acquire foreign exhibits, which seemed overwhelmingly important.

Some odd numbers from The St. Louis Republic, December 02, 1904. It's interesting how news writing of the early 20th-c. reads pretty much like pap. Just lots of embellishment and aggrandization of incredibly minor details, none of the really interesting facts.

"The fair planners had a contractual obligation to demolish the fair grounds and return Forest Park to sort of a predetermined lands. They were legally obligated to do that. The problem on the Pike was they were all concessionaires and everything they had set up was all theirs. They couldn't sell it for anything. The costs of demolition were greater than the value of what there was to salvage," said Dr. Robert Archibald.

Screenshot_284.jpg st louis numbers.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

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#7
I will see if we can locate any “better quality” photos of this so-called expositions. Seems like for whatever reason a very limited number of photos is available.

This plaster thing sounds very fishy, just like the entire enterprise. Going from city to city demolishing the legacy makes more sense.

Very convenient. 1,500 buildings wiped out only in St. Louis. No questions asked. And none will be asked about local Elmer Fishers, when there are no buildings left. Especially if you factor in the Great St. Luis fire of 1849.

I see a pattern here: the Great Fire followed by an Expo equals the destruction of historical evidence.
 

KorbenDallas

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#9
1875 map of missouri, shows forest park. No buildings. Only hippodrome

David Rumsey Maps - search St. Louis maps.
Love the site. Interesting stuff, but this one doesn't hold water.
This is a theory. Obviously you need to be a chosen one, to know for a fact. None of us are.

Otherwise, you are absolutely right, it does not make sense. As a matter of fact, coordination needed to pull something like this off requires something barely short of a simulated reality (discussed somewhere here). Yet we have clear pattern, and other supporting occurrences.

On a separate note, maps are drawings. Presence of maps does not exclude the possibility of certain events taking place.

You probably had a chance to look at these drawing here: 400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa.
Somehow, in the 1800's there was a huge portion of undiscovered Africa. Yet, 400, 300 and 200 years prior, those areas were well known to people. So what's to be trusted?

The other issue is the actual time frame.
 
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CyborgNinja

CyborgNinja

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#10
1875 map of missouri, shows forest park. No buildings. Only hippodrome

David Rumsey Maps - search St. Louis maps.
Love the site. Interesting stuff, but this one doesn't hold water.
Hey thats cool. Good find. I wonder what became of that hypodrome. Perhaps the exhibition was just hemp and plaster.
 

KorbenDallas

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Hey thats cool. Good find. I wonder what became of that hypodrome. Perhaps the exhibition was just hemp and plaster.
The thing is, it is possible to be wrong. We can be wrong, somebody else can be wrong. This is a very tricky topic we are dealing with.

What truly matters is the type of evidence. Some evidence is solid, and some is questionable. We have no clue about the volume of the retroactively produced maps. Those exist in great numbers.

For example Egyptian Pyramids supposed to exist for thousands of years. But upon closer examination of the maps we learn, that the Pyramids somehow escaped mapping up to the point when Napoleon went to Egypt. That, for a second, took place 1798–1801. Does it mean that Great Pyramids were built at the end of the 18th century? I don't know.

There is only one real old map where 3 Pyramids are present, that I know of. Which coincidentally makes me think that that specific map was doctored.
 
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CyborgNinja

CyborgNinja

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#12
There are two possibilities. Either everything we seen relating to the exhibition is as they say and it was just a temporary thing. Or there has been a conspiracy to cover up the older city that was here which would include the forging of maps and documents. I'm open to either possibility.
 

KorbenDallas

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#13
There are two possibilities. Either everything we seen relating to the exhibition is as they say and it was just a temporary thing. Or there has been a conspiracy to cover up the older city that was here which would include the forging of maps and documents. I'm open to either possibility.
If there was only one instance, we probably would not even be talking about this. We have tens of these.

This is 1904, which is supposedly over 60 years after the photography was invented. I am struggling to find any decent photos of this thing. 10-12 pics are circulating, that's it. Others are graphics only.

I'm struggling to lock in the time period here. Can't find a single photo with some car, or other datable object.

There is not a single production blueprint pertaining to any of the buildings to be found.

Nothing is obvious about it, even the exact location.
 

The Kraken

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#14
These Expos get really unnerving when you start looking into them. List here.

1200px-Pan-American_Exposition,_Buffalo,_1901.jpg

Pan American Exposition Buffalo 1901 - Wiki.

The bridge with the four pillars center of this picture.

buffalo expo bridge.jpg

The Triumphal Bridge, which was positioned over the "Mirror Lake".

Here it is after they started pulling it down.

buffalo bridge demo.jpg

Looks awful strong for a temporary building

Made from precast panels of Staff over a wood and metal frame, that this product able to withstand damage even during demolitions is astounding.

The best stories are the Expo rabbit holes.


Assassination of President McKinley

Main article: Assassination of William McKinley


McKinley's last speech delivered September 5, 1901. The exposition is most remembered because President William McKinley was shot by an anarchist, Leon Czolgosz, at the Temple of Music on September 6, 1901. The President died eight days later on September 14 from gangrene caused by the bullet wounds.

On the day prior to the shooting, McKinley had given an address at the exposition, which began as follows:

"Expositions are the timekeepers of progress. They record the world's advancement. They stimulate the energy, enterprise, and intellect of the people; and quicken human genius. They go into the home. They broaden and brighten the daily life of the people. They open mighty storehouses of information to the student."​
The newly developed X-ray machine was displayed at the fair, but doctors were reluctant to use it on McKinley to search for the bullet because they did not know what side effects it might have had on him. Also, the operating room at the exposition's emergency hospital did not have any electric lighting, even though the exteriors of many of the buildings were covered with thousands of light bulbs. Doctors used a pan to reflect sunlight onto the operating table as they treated McKinley's wounds.

This part is most telling.

At an event featuring the awesome power of electricity as a central focus

electric tower at night pan american expo 1901.jpg
That tower on the left is The Electric Tower

If you feel like an interesting read take a look at this
"The Evolution of Exposition Lighting"

The summary being

The engineer who designs the illumination of an exposition has by no means an easy task. It is not simply a question of circuits, though that is no child's play for a distribution to as many lamps as there are at the Pan-American, nor is it a question of placing a light here and there for immediate use. The expert on illumination must be able to see in the mind's eye the effect he will produce when the exposition is at a stage when the grounds are barren and the architectural features are but little further advanced than in sketches. The prospectus and preliminary report of the lighting of the Pan-American were of necessity prepared from such meager data, and yet substantially all the electric and fountain requirements were anticipated therein.
So an entire Field was created where people studied and perfected the science/art of lighting these Expos using electricity

As electricity was the first medium to render comprehensive illumination of the grounds and buildings possible, it was but natural that impossibilities should be expected of it. The history of the Chicago World's Fair is full of vagaries and delusions that by turning on electricity the daylight might be loaded with rainbows and the night flooded with sunshine. Now nature not only forbids such extravagances, but true art, as well as expediency and cost, condemns them. The first duty of an expert in lighting is to emphasize the fact that we can but secure relative effects, the harmony of which will accomplish infinitely more than costly and laborious sensationalism. To an eye that has been fixed on the sun the glow of the incandescent lamp is a sickly yellow, and the beam of the arc a ghastly blue, but coming out of the darkness into a room properly lighted by incandescents, we enjoy at once a feeling of cheerfulness.
Yet these experts forgot to put lights in the hospital........

McKinley_operating_room.png
Someones getting fired


Personally I feel if the entire event was planned and built from the ground up they would have wired the inside of the buildings with lights.....
 

KorbenDallas

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#15
Circumstantial evidence is pretty much all we have at this point. I think there could be multiple reasons to explain each individual occurrence of whatever. When you look at it from the complex stand point, things start to display similar traits, yet still pretty circumstantial.

One thing I know for a fact, is that no matter what the material used, it is impossible to build anything of this magnitude without an army of engineers, craftsmen and such. There is no information on blueprints, calculations performed, etc.

As far as possible atmospheric electricity used, it brings up a whole new topic. One thing for sure, some of these exposition displays (in the dark) do resemble 16-17 century engravings we have seen.
 

humanoidlord

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#16
These Expos get really unnerving when you start looking into them. List here.


Pan American Exposition Buffalo 1901 - Wiki.

The bridge with the four pillars center of this picture.


The Triumphal Bridge, which was positioned over the "Mirror Lake".

Here it is after they started pulling it down.


Looks awful strong for a temporary building

Made from precast panels of Staff over a wood and metal frame, that this product able to withstand damage even during demolitions is astounding.

The best stories are the Expo rabbit holes.


Assassination of President McKinley

Main article: Assassination of William McKinley


McKinley's last speech delivered September 5, 1901. The exposition is most remembered because President William McKinley was shot by an anarchist, Leon Czolgosz, at the Temple of Music on September 6, 1901. The President died eight days later on September 14 from gangrene caused by the bullet wounds.

On the day prior to the shooting, McKinley had given an address at the exposition, which began as follows:

"Expositions are the timekeepers of progress. They record the world's advancement. They stimulate the energy, enterprise, and intellect of the people; and quicken human genius. They go into the home. They broaden and brighten the daily life of the people. They open mighty storehouses of information to the student."​
The newly developed X-ray machine was displayed at the fair, but doctors were reluctant to use it on McKinley to search for the bullet because they did not know what side effects it might have had on him. Also, the operating room at the exposition's emergency hospital did not have any electric lighting, even though the exteriors of many of the buildings were covered with thousands of light bulbs. Doctors used a pan to reflect sunlight onto the operating table as they treated McKinley's wounds.

This part is most telling.

At an event featuring the awesome power of electricity as a central focus

That tower on the left is The Electric Tower

If you feel like an interesting read take a look at this
"The Evolution of Exposition Lighting"

The summary being



So an entire Field was created where people studied and perfected the science/art of lighting these Expos using electricity



Yet these experts forgot to put lights in the hospital........

Someones getting fired


Personally I feel if the entire event was planned and built from the ground up they would have wired the inside of the buildings with lights.....
100% atmospheric eletricity
 

The Kraken

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#17
We are trying to look at mural on a wall but some one has covered it in hundreds of flyers for the local circus. All we can see are the small gaps between the pictures of clowns and women in tights.
We have all seen enough cracks of information we now know there is some thing behind the crap .
 

KorbenDallas

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#18
For me the most interesting part here is not what we are being lied about. I'm rather interested to find out why.
 

The Kraken

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#19
For me the most interesting part here is not what we are being lied about. I'm rather interested to find out why.
That is the 64 million dollar question.
My family on both sides can trace itself back to 1700ish then stops.
It feels like every one in the world sat down and agreed not to ever talk about something ever again. Then filled in the gaps with identical people. Napoleon 1-3 comes to mind.

I need 20 years and several old estates libarys.
 
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