The Raising of Chicago 1856

LordAverage

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#21
I understand that theres all types of mechanisms to take advantage of leverage and such but isn't 1 horspower still a very limiting factor in moving an entire freaking building. Either with the amount of time it would take to move apparently there was time and horses to move businesses to the 'outskirts of the city'.

I had no idea buildings could be moved around like this so easily period, don't we just rebuild everything these days.
 
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#24
I call bullshit on 3+ story stone/brick buildings being moved in the manner described. Where’s the supporting foundations? The building perimeter walls would need to be at least a metre or two below ground. The jacks appear to only be on the outer walls of the building - how would one get to the centre? It would just crack all over and crumble.
 

alieniam

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#26
Here is the interesting info about movement and relocation of the buildings in Moscow in 1930's. It's in Russian but I'm sure there is something available in English. In the video there is footage of how it was done and some interviews and comments. What's interesting is that at the end of the video reporter says that "the secret of moving such buildings is almost forgotten now, being replaced by simple erase/demolish build new structure".


Wait... Just 1930's and now suddenly noone knows how to do it? And you wonder why people forgot how they built anything 1000 years ago.

The article is in Russian. There are many like this in Google.
Шагающие дома: что и как двигали в Москве

I thought it would be interesting for you.
 
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ISeenItFirst

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#27
Hmm, can anyone find some tech that would've been actually used for this building movements? 1868 boring machine, and some other equipment examples
I don't buy the boring machine. Not that it isn't possible, I just don't buy it. I think it is one of the crudest "this is how we did(nt do) it" contraptions.

As for the buildings, they generally cut them off the existing foundations and set them on a new one.

The process is a variation on underpinning. Most cities have a lot of guidelines on this kind of work. Search underpinning permit. I know DC has a separate paper on it available at the permit office website, which in DC falls under consumer and regulatory affairs (DCRA)

Anyhow, you basically install temp support, cut out foundation, install moving supports. Each one at a time, so you unload a few feet of foundation, at a time.

It is done for a lot of reasons besides moving a structure. Mostly related to repairing or replacing a foundation or a portion of it, installing missing footers or drainage, or digging out a basement.
I understand that theres all types of mechanisms to take advantage of leverage and such but isn't 1 horspower still a very limiting factor in moving an entire freaking building. Either with the amount of time it would take to move apparently there was time and horses to move businesses to the 'outskirts of the city'.

I had no idea buildings could be moved around like this so easily period, don't we just rebuild everything these days.
One horse is around 15 horsepower max actually. The rigging is really the limit. Was it Archimedes who said that bit about a lever long enough and a place to stand?
Here is the interesting info about movement and relocation of the buildings in Moscow in 1930's. It's in Russian but I'm sure there is something available in English. In the video there is footage of how it was done and some interviews and comments. What's interesting is that at the end of the video reporter says that "the secret of moving such buildings is almost forgotten now, being replaced by simple erase/demolish build new structure".


Wait... Just 1930's and now suddenly noone knows how to do it? And you wonder why people forgot how they built anything 1000 years ago.

The article is in Russian. There are many like this in Google.
Шагающие дома: что и как двигали в Москве

I thought it would be interesting for you.
I think it's less about forgetting the technique and more about the construction methods have changed and building are not as easily moved. Now it is cheaper to tear down and rebuild.

Most around here know, if you want a house or barn building raised up, dug out or moved, you don't call the advanced engineers, you call the Amish, if you can find their phone number. Much faster, much cheaper.
 
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PrimalRed

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#28
While my initial reaction was calling complete bullshit, I do have to admit that these olde world people had some incredibly crafty techniques. I read a book once about all the old trades from 1600-1800s, before electricity and machinery revolutionized our industries. There was some incredibly brilliant engineering back then. And lots of very skilled professions that are simply extinct today.

One example: when welding propellers to large ships, a large furnace would be built right on site and they'd heat the metal up for 3 days straight with a crew of men shoveling coal day and night. Finally when the perfect temperature was reached, which takes a master blacksmith to recognize, 50 men would simultaneously hammer the pieces together and forge weld them right on the spot. Forge welding is incredibly skill intensive even on small scale. To think they could do it with giant 50 ton chunks of metal is mind blowing.

So I don't think moving entire buildings is impossible. Weird and crazy from our perspective today, but not impossible.
 

whitewave

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#29
This map has Chilaga where Chicago is:
Map of America or the New World in 'Theatrum Orbis Tearrarum' by Abraham Ortelius, 1570


Newpaper article: IS LONG-LOST CHILAGA THE CAMELOT OF CHECAGOU?
Oklahoma has a lot of different tribes here that didn't originate here. I try to learn from all of them about their original stomping grounds (states) and the etymology of their languages. Chicago, called by the Miami and later Pottawatomi natives was called Chicaguoa. Apparently, before the white guys showed up, that area was a huge garlic field. Chicaguoa means "it stinks" (smells like garlic). :) Having been to Chicago, I agree with the assessment.
As for Chilaga, there's also one in Nepal by that name. But here on this Piri Reis Map of 1513 it mentions it being more toward Montreal. Basically says it was a misunderstanding/mispronunciation of some other name.
 
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#30
Yeah too bad they didn't have a couple of these tractor/engine things to help them move buildings.

This is a post card from 1900, Germany and I have no idea why it says 2000 on the bottom right hand corner. And also right before 2000 it says Jahre and I know a little German and "jahre" means year.

I dont know if somebody already answered you, but i recall seeing this image in a site where it said something like "How 20th century people imagined how the 21th century would look like" , thats why it says "Year 2000". I could be wrong tho.
While my initial reaction was calling complete bullshit, I do have to admit that these olde world people had some incredibly crafty techniques. I read a book once about all the old trades from 1600-1800s, before electricity and machinery revolutionized our industries. There was some incredibly brilliant engineering back then. And lots of very skilled professions that are simply extinct today.

One example: when welding propellers to large ships, a large furnace would be built right on site and they'd heat the metal up for 3 days straight with a crew of men shoveling coal day and night. Finally when the perfect temperature was reached, which takes a master blacksmith to recognize, 50 men would simultaneously hammer the pieces together and forge weld them right on the spot. Forge welding is incredibly skill intensive even on small scale. To think they could do it with giant 50 ton chunks of metal is mind blowing.

So I don't think moving entire buildings is impossible. Weird and crazy from our perspective today, but not impossible.
Do you still have that book or at least know the name of it?
 
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Ice Nine

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#31
Germany_in_XXI_century._House.jpg


I dont know if somebody already answered you, but i recall seeing this image in a site where it said something like "How 20th century people imagined how the 21th century would look like" , thats why it says "Year 2000". I could be wrong tho.
Oh that's too funny, because I found it on a website that was about techniques to move buildings, there was no mention of what this really was.
I just looked it up now and found lots of stuff like that. Thank you for clueing me in. I better check my sources better.
 

BStankman

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#32
View attachment 12444

Oh that's too funny, because I found it on a website that was about techniques to move buildings, there was no mention of what this really was.
I just looked it up now and found lots of stuff like that. Thank you for clueing me in. I better check my sources better.
What the hell?
First they tell us the cities grew like clocks.
thrones.jpg

Now Peter Jackson has cities on wheels, and London is going steal all the world resources.
2105814.jpg-r_640_360-f_jpg-q_x-xxyxx.jpg
 

nothingnew

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#33
Yeah too bad they didn't have a couple of these tractor/engine things to help them move buildings.

This is a post card from 1900, Germany and I have no idea why it says 2000 on the bottom right hand corner. And also right before 2000 it says Jahre and I know a little German and "jahre" means year.


Top left "Hildebrands Deutsche Schokolade" - Hildebrands german chocolate
Bottom right "Bewegliche Häuser im Jahre 2000" - moveable houses in the Year 2000

what_year_is_it.jpg


I'll just drop these here, it seems that Hildebrand was established in 1817. Straight out of the rubble. To me they seem like the NWO or the one headed eagle. No more Kaiser or the first born son - rule. The 2nd, 3rd, 4th and all the other bastard children conspired and got rid of him so "everyone" can rule. Well, everyone from this bloodline don't get it twisted.

The official version tells us that these are just artists visions/depictions of the future. If that is really true, then moving buildings or bringing them to the surface after the mudflood was not possible at the time. Or was it? Weather machines, submarines and flying buses. If these were not enough, how about a ship that travels on rails, into water and straight to the North Pole? The North Pole shown is not completely under ice and we can see land and what appears to be a huge mountain (Mt. Meru perhaps?).


Today they are owned by the Baronie Group. If the name doesn't tell you everything you need to know, there's a logo with the pyramid as well. If you care to look at the receipt, the two fags on one horse. Yep, that's them as they had to flee the castle because they were not the first son. They settled in monasteries all over Europe so that may be the reason so much evil is going on there.

Whoops
51FDJmrJQoL.jpg
tempelritter-relief-templerorden-siegel_2.jpg


8.jpg 38739-AK-BERLIN-Litho-Gruss.jpg come-nel-1900-immaginavano-il-2000-7.jpg 103472-Berlin-Hildebrand-Sohn-um-1900-Schokolade.jpg Hildebrand-Berlin-Kakao-und-Schokoladenfabrik-Rechnung-1939-Schokolade.jpg 6134724391_de848b2e5f_z.jpg 12796456653_139a3909b4_b.jpg 12796479433_895dfe80cb_b.jpg 12796494993_7080f59dc5_b.jpg 12796803754_ae5d24c819_b.jpg 12796373065_ca839fcc1e_b.jpg ed4856be878396a5d2f844ddf8b244b6.jpg english-stroll-on-water-in-the-year-2000-germany-hildebrand-factory-chocolade-2000-2008-deutsc...jpg Germany_in_XXI_century._In_air.jpg Germany_in_XXI_century._In_water.jpg Germany_in_XXI_century._On_Nord.jpg Germany_in_XXI_century._Wheather.jpg Hildebrand-Sohn-Theodor-Berlin-Hrsg-Hildebrands.jpg
 
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wizz33

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#34
on those zeppelins
from a medium amount of gas to everyone needs a balloon to no balloon but how does a propeller work
 
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#35
I don't believe the entire story about the city being raised. Photography existed back then, why so few photographs? Surely, every photographer who heard of this incredible feat would have been over there, camera in hand, to take as many pictures as possible, from a variety of angles and vantage points. Yet all we have are a few grainy photos and some drawings of this event. And apparently, moving buildings around like pieces on a game board was fairly common, as people had to wait while entire buildings floated past. But still no photographs. Did these things really happen? Or were the photos purged so that we wouldn't see the actual technology being used?
 
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#36
Additionally, it would be nice to figure out why they had to go through this endeavor, and when.

We have quite a few of different places either regrading, or like Chicago raising buildings. Reasons are different and years are different, yet the purpose of such activities stays the same.

Chances that the same event caused all the comotion here appear to be pretty high. If the same event is indeed the reason, than the chronological placement of such raising/regrading activities would have to be readjusted.
 
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