Vikings, Erik the Red and Eric VI the King of Sweden

KorbenDallas

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#1
I don't know, may be this parallel has been drawn before. I did not search for whether it was or not. Somehow, I ended up reading about Vikings. Considering that our official history cannot be trusted, I was trying to figure out how the Norse seafarers were coexisting with other Scandinavian Nobility. I did not advance much in my endeavor, but I ran into a couple coincidences which I figured were worth sharing. Some of those coincidences pertain to the origin of words.

viking-warrior.jpg


Vikings
Vikings (Old English: wicing—"pirate", Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who during the late 8th to late 11th centuries, raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of Europe, and explored westwards to Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Norse home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age. This period of Nordic military, mercantile and demographic expansion constitutes an important element in the early medieval history of Scandinavia, Estonia, the British Isles, France, Kievan Rus' and Sicily.
  • As we can see the word "Viking" appears to check out just fine. Supported by multiple languages everything looks cool.
  • The question I have is this - why the word sounding similar to "Viking" was acquired by those languages in first place, and when?
Eric the Victorious
Eric V or Eric VI
Eric the Victorious (c.945 - c.995) was a Swedish monarch as of around 970. Since he is the first Swedish king in a consecutive regnal succession, who is attested in sources independent of each other, Sweden's list of rulers usually begins with him. His son Olof Skötkonung, however, is considered the first ruler documented to definitely have been accepted both by the original Swedes around Lake Mälaren and by the Geats around Lake Vättern, which peoples were fundamental in forming the nation of Sweden.
Eric the Victorious
Eric the Victorious.jpg

c.945 - c.995

Some sources have referred to Eric the Victorious as either King Eric V or Eric VI, modern inventions by counting backwards from Eric XIV (1560–68), who adopted his numeral according to a mythological history of Sweden. Whether or not there were any Swedish monarchs named Eric before Eric the Victorious is disputed, with some historians claiming that there were several earlier Erics, and others questioning the reliability of the primary sources used and the existence of these earlier monarchs. The list of monarchs after him is also complicated and sketchy in some early periods, which makes the assignment of any numeral problematic whether counting backward or forward.
  • Pretty sure I'm stretching a bit here, for there is no proof that this Eric was at any time used any numerals next to his name. At the same time Eric VI King was read by me as Eric Viking.
  • Naturally, I started looking for a Viking who would resemble Eric VI.
Erik the Red
Erik Thorvaldsson (950 - c.1003), known as Erik the Red was a Norse explorer, remembered in medieval and Icelandic saga sources as having founded the first settlement in Greenland. According to Icelandic sagas, he was born in the Jæren district of Rogaland, Norway, as the son of Þorvald Ásvaldsson. He therefore also appears, patronymically, as Erik Thorvaldsson (Eiríkr Þorvaldsson). The appellation "the Red" most likely refers to his hair color and the color of his beard. Leif Erikson, the famous Icelandic explorer, was Erik's son.
Erik the Red
Erik-le-Rouge.jpg

950 - c.1003
I don't know about you, but the above 17th century depiction of Erik the Red... the ViKing, brings up a few questions:
  • Why this viking looks like any average medieval knight?
  • When was all this "Viking Saga" really happening?
  • Who were the vikings in reality?
******
KD: Somehow I see two Eriks (or Erics) operating in the same vicinity at the same time without running into each other (at least I did not find any reference). I think that both of this distinguished historical figures could be one and the same. They could also be the reason we call a certain type of historical figures... vikings.
  • Erik the Red (950 - c.1003) = Eric VI King (c.945 - c.995) = ViKing?
  • America - somehow we have a bit of Eric in America. Just a coincidence?
To be honest, I did not look much into the available history of each involved individual here. Simply shared a few observations which kind of stuck out.

While this post is supposed to entirely pertain to the etymology of the word VIKING, I wanted to point out that back in the day people thought that Vikings looked differently. Wonder why.

- Sea-faring Danes depicted invading England. Illustration from the 12th century Miscellany on the Life of St. Edmund.

Wikinger.jpg

- An emperor of the Byzantine Empire is guarded by two Vikings with spear (Varangian Guardsmen). From the Chronicle of John Skylitzes.

Emperor_Theophilos_Chronicle_of_John_Skylitzes.jpg
 
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#2
The name for America has nothing to do wirh this. History books name it for Amerigo vespucci, which i have always read as BS. Others say its a templar/mason thing as they name a great land/treasure in the west, under tthe star called Merica.
 
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#3
The word Viking could also mean VI Kings(or Kingdoms) of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Greenland.

I also believe that the Vikings could have been connected with the Phonecians and later would become the Templar’s. They were not wild savage barbarians.
 
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ISeenItFirst

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#5
I have believed that the Vikings were a mercenary arm of the Vatican. It sure seems that they received supplies from them.
 

dreamtime

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#6
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Ice Nine

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#8
This is fun, I tried gingers
Gingers
and got the same results, so nobody was commenting on the hair color and yet being a red head is pretty rare, so you would think it would be worth commenting about.
some really interesting facts, genetic facts about Redheads, pretty good stuff here. they are not exactly like the rest of us. After you read this, you might be wondering what color eyes the red-headed elongated skull people had. not that there is any mention of elongated skulls, but I just thought about the red hair and the rarity of blue eyes.

Why Red Hair And Blue Eyes Is So Rare, Plus 4 Other Surprising Facts About Redheads

Erik the Red would have mostly likely had red hair, but is is ever mentioned, other than his name. I mean i thought it was interesting too that red hair isn't mentioned until around 1750.
 
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Sawdy

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Thinking along the lines of people rumored to have red hair, I looked up Redbeard.

from Wikipedia:

Redbeard or Red Beard may refer to:
People
Frederick Barbarossa (Redbeard), another name for Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor (1122–1190)
Oruç Reis or Redbeard (Barbarossa) (1474–1518), Ottoman naval commander
Hayreddin Barbarossa or Red Beard (1478–1546), privateer and Ottoman admiral

Hayreddin is the brother to Oruc (which sounds suspiciously like Erik). Frederick also has "Erik" in his name.

Could it be that tales are really about the same person, just embellished or some details removed? Frederick is the king of at least 4 areas. Oruc is a naval commander in a different time period, but from reading enough of these threads, time has been manipulated.

I find the topic of red hair interesting but think it deserves its own thread, so I will save any other red head stuff I have found over time for that when someone starts one.
 

Ice Nine

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#10
I've been studying myths and legends forever and there are just a few basic elements in every tale. Not to get off track, just agreeing that many times we are talking about a single person. I do family genealogy and you can't believe how one person will get credited with some incidents and it didn't happen or was a different person all together. So in just a few generations things get muddled, add a few hundred or who knows how many years to a tale and see what we get.
It's like Italian food, all you need is some cheese, meat, marinara sauce and pasta and you can make any number of dishes with the same basic ingredients, just with different names.
 

Glumlit

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#11
Good point. My dad's got plenty of stories where I could've sworn he said it was a different brother or cousin of his every time he tells the story.

Who knows how my kids will remember and retell those exact same stories when I don't even know what was true
 

UnusualBean

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#13
Erik the Red would have mostly likely had red hair, but is is ever mentioned, other than his name. I mean i thought it was interesting too that red hair isn't mentioned until around 1750.
There are mentions of "red hair" in the 16th century using that tool.

Also, I don't know how old the story is, but an Ainu folktale mentions red hair.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#14
There are mentions of "red hair" in the 16th century using that tool.
Sometimes the chart says that there is something when in reality there is none. That's when you click on the time frame below the chart and see if there are any actual pubs.
 

UnusualBean

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#15
Sometimes the chart says that there is something when in reality there is none. That's when you click on the time frame below the chart and see if there are any actual pubs.
Hmmmm, well there are entries from the 17th century. Weirdly, on the first page it says there are 3 pages of results, but on the second page it says there are only 2. Glitch, or something that got removed? :unsure:
 

Ice Nine

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#16
Either gingers or red hair and it shows a little over 1750. Well anyway, that tool can't know everything ever written, maybe Erik the Red was called that because he killed a lot of people or he himself was a berserker and saw red a lot, or maybe just calling him the red is self explanatory.

It always seems no mater what new to me myth or legend I would come across, I'd be thinking, Hey, I've seen this movie before!! only this or that would be a bit different or the names changed, but yeah same stories. So it has lead me to think there was only one big event and it was world wide. Every civilization has basically the same stories, those that can remember anyway. I think there has been multiple cataclysmic events here, but one especially involved all of mankind and left it in all of our collective memories. And a ton of ancient mining by somebody, most likely in the time of giants. Before the main event. And don't ask me when that was.
 
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