Was this 1891 Washington State Map possible?

Was this 1891 Washington State Map possible?

  • Yes

    Votes: 3 50.0%
  • No

    Votes: 2 33.3%
  • I'm not sure

    Votes: 1 16.7%

  • Total voters
    6

KorbenDallas

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#1
Just wanted to get an independent opinion on the possibility of the below 1891 map being produced when they say it was. Here is a bit of the Washington State history, and stats first:
washington_state_territory.jpg

So, there we have it. The very first officially recognized settlement in the future State of Washington took place in 1846. The below presented map was published in Buffalo, New York in 1892, with 1891 copyright.

Here is the Washington State/Territory historical census data:
  • 1845: 0
  • 1870: 23,955
  • 1880: 75,116
  • 1890: 357,232
Could you please zoom in for a high resolution version of the below map. The State of Washington is in the top left quarter of the four-state map. Please take a look at this map and at what was achieved by 1891.

It was produced in under 45 years, with all the terrain features, roads, railroads, county lines, cities, towns and what not.

Question #1: do you think it was possible to produce the below map by 1891, only 45 years after the arrival of the first settlers?
Question #2: was it possible to settle an develop this territory, considering that up till 1880 there were only 75k, and up till 1890 only 357k people to do so?

1891 Washington State
1891_Washington_State_1.jpg

Two 1891 maps of the State of Washington:
:geek: - @Ice Nine would probably appreciate that just about every single city, or town she knows was already present on this 1891 map.
 

Ice Nine

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#2
I can comment on the accuracy of the maps, they have all the towns that are no longer towns, lots of old coal mining towns that are now nonexistent and there are more than a few towns missing that I know of, but they all became towns after 1891. There are the railroads tracks where they should be and no roads where there shouldn't be roads.
It's a very detailed map and quite accurate. I think it was possible to make such a map, Also Oregon is spot on. what I'm sayin is, that things match up to how things were in 1891. As far as I know, and my family has living in Washington state since 1890.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#3
First_flight2.jpg

Above is the Wright's alleged first flight of 1903. (The photo was conveniently first published only in 1908. That's besides the point.) Meaning, that apart from them using hot air balloons, them surveyors would have had to actually walk the ground to map all this.

Surveyors_Lead_Chainmen-of-the-United-States-Geological-Survey.jpg

Unless guys like these walked every single river, climbed every ridge, and circled/scaled every mountain present on the map, this map would not be possible. So, did they really do that? Western Washington has some pretty thick woods, and plenty of rough terrain. Carbon river area by Orting would attest to that.

So how many surveyors would they have to employ to map 71,362 mi² to the point where elevation of Mount Rainier is only 33 feet off (14,444 vs. 14.411 today)? We also need to remember that Washingtonians were gainfully employed in construction at the time.

Having done my fair share of road marching which is called hiking when done for pleasure, I have my doubts that this could be accomplished with the official narrative compliant means, and tools.
 

Ice Nine

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#4
They must have got the height of Mt. Rainier from this guy's calculations. I have no idea how people make any map correct without having an aerial view. I'm surprised any maps made before flight are so accurate.
the bottom of the article.

THE EVER-CHANGING ELEVATION

Year, Elevation, Credit, Method

1841 12,333 Lt. Charles Wilkes Triangulation
1879 14,444 James Smyth Lawson Barometer
1888 14,524 E.S. Ingraham Barometer
1896 14,519 USGS Barometer
1897 14,528 Edgar McClure Barometer
1902 14,363 USGS Barometer
1905 14,394 Alexander McAdie Barometer
1914 14,408 USGS Triangulation
1956 14,410 USGS Triangulation
1989 14,411.1 LSAW GPS
1999 14,411.05 LSAW GPS

SOURCES: National Park Service and Land Surveyors of Washington
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#6
These maps were likely copied/translated from other civilizations/cultures. I don't know for sure but to me that explains how they were supposed to be made so detailed and so quickly. Especially the colonial maps.
That's what I was thinking. Without aerial capabilities, the achievements appear to be questionable.

Naturally wondering, how many years it would have taken, let's say, 500 surveyors, working non-stop to map 71,362 mi².
 

asatiger1966

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#7
Just wanted to get an independent opinion on the possibility of the below 1891 map being produced when they say it was. Here is a bit of the Washington State history, and stats first:

So, there we have it. The very first officially recognized settlement in the future State of Washington took place in 1846. The below presented map was published in Buffalo, New York in 1892, with 1891 copyright.

Here is the Washington State/Territory historical census data:
  • 1845: 0
  • 1870: 23,955
  • 1880: 75,116
  • 1890: 357,232
Could you please zoom in for a high resolution version of the below map. The State of Washington is in the top left quarter of the four-state map. Please take a look at this map and at what was achieved by 1891.

It was produced in under 45 years, with all the terrain features, roads, railroads, county lines, cities, towns and what not.

Question #1: do you think it was possible to produce the below map by 1891, only 45 years after the arrival of the first settlers?
Question #2: was it possible to settle an develop this territory, considering that up till 1880 there were only 75k, and up till 1890 only 357k people to do so?

1891 Washington State
View attachment 12827
Two 1891 maps of the State of Washington:
:geek: - @Ice Nine would probably appreciate that just about every single city, or town she knows was already present on this 1891 map.
Yes, we spent two years surveying in around Sliver and Lead mines. Where there were precious metals they got looked at much earlier . Private individuals had to survey their claims and turn them in to the state. A bunch of acres were searched over at that time.

Screenshot_2018-11-24 Land Matters Historical Mining Claims.png
 

whitewave

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#10
When I read of what all these early pioneers accomplished in such a short time frame with no power tools or modern conveniences, it makes me feel like a slacker. Wonder if the differences in elevation between 1879-1999 (loss of 33 feet) is due to differences in calculating methods or mud flood burial of 33 feet?
 

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