Ruins painted by François de Nomé

Magnus

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#3
In the fourth (final) painting shown, there is a huge undergeound cavern that has a giant iron gate barring its entrance.
On the ground, toward the entrance to the arched underground vault, there is what appears to be a book, a LARGE GIANT SIZED BOOK with a man and four dogs. The man is half the size of one page from the book!
The entrance to the underground cavern is also a HUGE, GIANT sized entrance!! With a massive iron gate.

I also notice what appears to be an angel (demon?) flying above nearby them, and the flying figure is carrying a man by his hair and seems to be showing him the destruction.

This reminds me of Ezekiel Chapter 8 specifically verse 3.
From the King James Version:
"And he put forth the form of an hand, and took me by a lock of mine head; and the spirit lifted me up between the earth and the heaven, and brought me in the visions of God to Jerusalem, to the door of the inner gate that looketh toward the north; where was the seat of the image of jealousy, which provoketh to jealousy."


Could be an allusion to this biblical scene. The prophet is spirited away by a dazzlingly bright figure, carried by his hair and flown to witness the sins of Jerusalem (specifically the worship of the false god Tammuz, whose idol was set up inside the sanctuary of the true God. The True Living God sends an emmisary or messenger (angel literally means messenger) to the prophet, to receive a vision in order to then preach repentance to the people.
Also note, in the verse from Ezekiel, there is reference to a gate which faces north, could be the underground gate pictured?
 
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Klast

Klast

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#4
So I guess I want to say, pretty elaborate for a “dream”, maybe they did exist someplace. They aren’t sci-fi. They look like Roman or Greek ruins, maybe the chronology issue, they weren’t as old as we think?

More images

 

KorbenDallas

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#5
I think they did exist as well. All the ruin artists of the general time frame were essentially ridiculed by our contemporary know-it-alls.

What evidence do critics have to support that the artists were making stuff up.
 
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#6
These are fascinating!

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And noticed some more!

Pt.2 More incredible paintings by François de Nomé (1593 – after 1620). De Nomé created paintings of imaginary ruins - some inspired by the Fall of Rome & Sack of Troy. He lived 100 years before Piranesi & 300 before the Surrealists. He is almost completely unheard of today.
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