Alternate History of the World

 

Welcome to Tenochtitlan as it was in 1520

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Between July 1519 and September 1526, Hernando Cortés (1485-1547), the soldier and adventurer who in 1519-21 conquered for Spain what is now central and southern Mexico, sent five extended letters to Emperor Charles V in which he described his exploits and placed himself and his actions in a...

Country that the Spaniards Found in 1521, Called Yucatan

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"The first encounter with the Yucatec Maya may have occurred in 1502, when the fourth voyage of Christopher Columbus came across a large trading canoe off Honduras. In 1511, Spanish survivors of the shipwrecked caravel called Santa María de la Barca sought refuge among native groups along the...

Mexican temple of Santiago, master builder monks and our failed archaeology

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I have this growing notion that our archaeology is meant to conceal our true history versus uncovering the mysteries of the past. Here is another prime example, which shows how lame the official position is. It is rather comical that the Associated Press which earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes...

The History of Rome has no Surviving Sources

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The Roman Empire is the model of much of our modern democracies. The lessons learned from the triumphs and disasters serve as examples and warnings to present politics. Indeed, much of our beloved literary works model their moral themes on the foibles of famous Romans.

Did Hannibal Actually Exist?

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I was poking around the darkest, dankest nooks of the internet when I happened upon this blog post. Ironically this was written as satire to exhibit how the existence of Hannibal is even harder to prove than a historical Jesus. The intended impression is meant to be Hannibal is real and so is...

Antwerp: authorities rebury our true history

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Our official archaeologists experience an orgasmic ecstasy when they find a stone arrowhead, an axe or discover an ancient fireplace. Yet, anything and everything capable of exposing the unpleasant truth gets destroyed, hidden, or dismissed as something insignificant. And we have plenty of proof...

The Phoenicians Once Ruled the World. They still do today!

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If you are like me not that long ago, you probably don't even know who the Phoenicians are. Maybe at most you've heard of them. And maybe you've even come across a few dismissive passages on them in your readings. But their impact is unquestionable, and once you start looking deep into the...

The ghost cities of China

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Amazing how one thing leads to another. Apparently, we have multiple cities in China having no population. As in, there are cities, but they are uninhabited. And this is in the 1.4 billion China. I knew of their existence (not thinking much of it) but in light of the recent "no people in...

Raising the Obelisks at Luxor temple.

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British engineer Steven Tasker proposes some very practical methods for erecting many of the structures in Egypt. His explanations focus on fulcrum lever and pulley systems. Bare in mind these methods do not explain all the engineering feats found in Egypt, simply the more recent ones. These...

Pre-1857 King's Boat in the Shape of a Fish. What kind of ship is this?

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She was a very unusual ship covered in fish-like scales possibly made of metal. Equipped with a rudder and displaying sliding doors, she allegedly belonged to the last Nawab of Awadh. It does not appear that this ship was designed to use oars, or sails. Two mermaid-like statues decorated her...

1915 Autopeds - first electric and gasoline motor scooters

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Just wanted to throw this out there. I keep on getting this notion, that some things do not belong to their time. On one hand the information is available if you know what to look for. On the other hand we do not run into stuff like this every day. I find it particularly weird, when a...

Towers of Bologna: the skyscrapers of the 12th century?

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Another interesting medieval story comes from the Italian city of Bologna. Apparently 800-900 years ago the citizens of Bologna enjoyed building tall towers. Between the 12th and the 13th century, the number of towers in the city was very high, possibly up to 180. The reasons for the...

World population: where are the missing trillions of people?

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Was browsing through some random 19th century family pictures provided by the Google Images search. And you can see for yourself that families were predominantly pretty big. I do understand that through out time there were wars, epidemics, volcano eruptions, floods, birth deaths, hurricanes, and...

St. Paul's Cathedral - Buffalo, NY (b.1851)

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Just a very short one, specific and dear to my heart. So, I wound up with this wonderful illustration of St. Paul's after seeing it a many years earlier online. I actually was met with scorn on a Buffalo Historical forum when I dared question some of the oddities contained in the illustration...

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