Smithsonian: Suppressed Archaeological Finds

whitewave

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James Smithson, an ENGLISH scientist bequeathed today's equivalent of half a million dollars in 1829 to the U.S. "for the advancement and diffusion of knowledge." Congress, as is their custom, promptly invested in some bad financial deals in Arkansas (of all places) and lost the whole wad. John Quincy Adams insisted that the money be paid back so the American people bailed out the Congress who pissed away a fortune and has been paying for the "gift of the Smithsonian" ever since-usually to the tune of about 947 million dollars a year! I have to question why an English scientist would leave his fortune to Americans rather than to England but I also wonder if it similar to that India prince who gave white elephants to people he didn't like. You couldn't very well get rid of such a gift but the cost of upkeep would drive you to bankruptcy.




The Smithsonian in its current iteration includes 19 museums, a castle, a zoo, 9 research centers, laboratories, book stores, gift stores, libraries, a television channel, their own magazine, an observatory, an herbarium housing more than 4.5 million plant species. They are on you tube, flicker, facebook and are funded by the government (you and me). They also have an air and space museum (containing the Columbia module from the Apollo 11 mission). They even have their own record label (Smithsonian Folkways Recordings).

The Smithsonian is governed by a board of regents consisting of the U.S. vice president, the chief justice of the United States, three senators appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate, three representatives appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives, and nine U.S. citizens chosen by the board and approved by joint resolution of Congress. The board administers the Smithsonian’s budget. Trust funds account for approximately a third of the institution’s operating costs; the remainder comes largely from annual congressional appropriations.
  • By law, the Chief Justice is also a member of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution and, by custom, is elected chancellor of the board.
The Smithsonian Institution established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the U.S. Wiki - Smithsonian Institution

So now that we've established that the Smithsonian Institute is just a fun place to spend a Saturday afternoon and couldn't possibly have any political agenda despite a massive annual budget approved by Congress and consisting of a board of regents comprised of high ranking government officials, let's take a look at their history.

The cover-up and alleged suppression of archaeological evidence began in late 1881 when John Wesley Powell, the geologist famous for exploring the Grand Canyon, appointed Cyrus Thomas as the director of the Eastern Mound Division of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of Ethnology. Thomas was an Isolationist and a bit of a racist who thought it impossible for "savages" from one side of the Mississippi to visit the "savages" on the other side of the Mississippi much less for primitive people to sail all the way over an ocean and bring their cultural artifacts with them and they certainly couldn't have been the mound builders. Powell, however, had lived for years with the Winnebago Indians and thought it unfair to consider Indians as "savages". - Source

The Smithsonian, under the direction of Powell, began to promote the idea that Native Americans, at that time being exterminated in the Indian Wars, were descended from advanced civilizations and were worthy of respect and protection. Cyrus Thomas won the battle of Isolationism vs Diffusionism, though, and the S.I. took an official stance denying and declaring as fraudulent any archaeological evidence supporting Diffusionism. There's evidence of suppression and rumors of actual destruction of artifacts as well. Poor James Smithson is probably twirling dervishly in his mausoleum.

Isolationism proposes that civilizations developed independently from one another and had very little contact, if any, with other civilizations, especially if oceans or lakes divided them. It was held that even contact between the civilizations of the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys were rare, and certainly these civilizations did not have any contact with such advanced cultures as the Mayas, Toltecs, or Aztecs in Mexico and Central America. By Old World standards this is an extreme, and even ridiculous idea, considering that the river system reached to the Gulf of Mexico and these civilizations were as close as the opposite shore of the gulf. It was like saying that cultures in the Black Sea area could not have had contact with the Mediterranean.

When the contents of many ancient mounds and pyramids of the Midwest were examined, it was shown that the history of the Mississippi River Valleys was that of an ancient and sophisticated culture that had been in contact with Europe and other areas. Not only that, the contents of many mounds revealed burials of huge men, sometimes seven or eight feet tall, in full armor with swords and sometimes huge treasures. But that doesn't fit the narrative either and besides, the textbooks have already been written and academicians careers could be jeopardized if some of these archaeological finds were to be made public.

One example is when Spiro Mound in Oklahoma was excavated in the 1930's, a tall man (7 ft.) in full armor was discovered along with a pot of thousands of pearls and other artifacts, the largest such treasure so far documented. The whereabouts of the man in armor is now unknown and it is quite likely that it eventually was taken to the Smithsonian Institution. Who else would you think to contact about a find like that? And how does one lose a 7 ft. skeleton and his horde of valuable pearls?
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THE most important archaeological institute in the United States, the Smithsonian Institute, an independent federal agency, has been actively suppressing some of the most interesting and important archaeological discoveries made in the Americas. The Vatican, too, has been long accused of keeping artifacts and ancient books in their vast cellars, without allowing the outside world access to them. These secret treasures, often of a controversial, historical, or religious nature, are allegedly suppressed by the Catholic Church because they might damage the church's credibility, or perhaps cast their official texts in doubt. Sadly, there is overwhelming evidence that something very similar is happening with the Smithsonian Institution.

Another highly publicized and still controversial find are the Acambaro, Mexico artifacts. In 1994 a German immigrant merchant, Jalsrud, stumbled across some unusual artifacts of ceramic, stone, jade, obsidian knives and strange figurines that are being argued over to this day. He took a few home but decided to hire some locals to keep digging to see if there were any more. Over 33,500 objects were unearthed.

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The Mexican government got involved, several authentic archaeologists, and paleontologists also investigated the find. Lab testing (radio carbon and thermoluminescent dating) was done by reputable labs AND universities. The objects were dated from 6,500 years ago, around 4,500 BC. The controversy started when it was discovered that several of the statues were of what could only be described as dinosaurs, some in association with humans. When this tidbit became common knowledge the labs and universities changed their minds and said the artifacts were only 30 years old. Then the archaeologists and paleontologists who had been AT the dig, witnessing the unearthing of the statues also changed their minds and said it was all a hoax and that the locals were making them to sell to the German merchant.

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In addition to the politically incorrect depiction of dinosaurs and humans interacting, there were representations of various ethnic groups not expected to be found in Mexico: Negroes, Orientals, bearded Caucasians, Egyptians, Sumerians, and even Bigfoot! There were aquatic monster like creatures, weird human-animal mixtures, and a host of other inexplicable creations. Teeth from an extinct Ice Age horse, the skeleton of a mammoth, and a number of human skulls were found at the same site as the ceramic artifacts. Jalsrud crammed this collection into twelve rooms of his expanded house.

In 1952, American archaeologist Charles C. DiPeso claimed to have minutely examined the then 32,000 pieces within not more than four hours spent at the home of Julsrud. Archaeological investigator John H. Tierney, who has lectured on the case for decades, points out that to have done that DiPeso would have had to have inspected 133 pieces per minute steadily for four hours, whereas in actuality, it would have required weeks merely to have separated the massive jumble of exhibits and arranged them properly for a valid evaluation. Carlos Perea, the Director of Archaeology for the Acambaro zone, for the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico City was present when official excavations were conducted by the National Museum and the American Museum of Natural History and declared them authentic. Remember that the Museum of Natural History (where most of these kinds of finds would go) is a division of the Smithsonian Institute.

Tierney, who collaborated later with Professor Hapgood, the late William N. Russell, and others in the investigation, charges that the Smithsonian Institution and other archaeological authorities conducted a campaign of disinformation against the discoveries. The Smithsonian had, early in the controversy, dismissed the entire Acambaro collection as an elaborate hoax. Also, utilizing the FOIA, Tierney discovered that practically the entirety of the Smithsonian's Julsrud case files are missing.

Adding to this controversy is the fact that the Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, through the late Director of PreHispanic Monuments, Dr. Eduardo Noguera, head of an official investigating team at the site, issued a report admitting "the apparent scientific legality with which these objects were found." Despite evidence of their own eyes, however, officials declared that because of the objects 'fantastic' nature, they had to have been a hoax played on Julsrud! A disappointed but ever-hopeful Julsrud died. His house was sold and the collection put in storage. The collection is not currently open to the public.

As a side note to this story: 2 local thieves were caught at the Texas border attempting to sell these artifacts on the black market. They were arrested AND CONVICTED of stealing national treasures and sent to prison. The courts were presented with the evidence, declared the artifacts genuine enough to imprison the 2 guys trying to sell them. If the artifacts had been deemed fakes/hoax items then they would have been guilty of nothing more than trying to peddle novelties.
Final example to prevent this from becoming a novella.
In 1892 in Alabama wooden coffins were discovered and sent to the S.I and promptly "lost". The Gungywamp Society in Connecticut (researches New England megalithic sites) put out an article in their 1992 STONEWATCH NEWSLETTER regarding the find. In the article, researcher Frederick J. Pohl in 1950 had written to the late Dr. T.C. Lethbridge, a British archaeologist.

The letter from Pohl stated, "A professor of geology sent me a reprint (of the) Smithsonian Institution, THE CRUMF BURIAL CAVE by Frank Burns, US Geological Survey, from the report of the US National Museum for 1892, pp 451-454, 1984. In the Crumf Cave, southern branch of the Warrior River, in Murphy's Valley, Blount County, Alabama, accessible from Mobile Bay by river, were coffins of walnut wood hollowed out by fire, aided by stone or copper chisels.
These coffins were taken to the Smithsonian. They were about 7.5 feet long, 14" to 18" wide, 6" to 7" deep. Lids open. "I wrote recently to the Smithsonian, and received a reply March 11th from F.M. Setzler, Head Curator of Department of Anthropology (He said) 'We have not been able to find the specimens in our collections, though records show that they were received."

David Barron, President of the Gungywamp Society was eventually told by the Smithsonian in 1992 that the coffins were actually wooden troughs and that they could not be viewed anyway because they were housed in an asbestos-contaminated warehouse. This warehouse was to be closed for the next ten years and no one was allowed in except the Smithsonian personnel! How very ingenious of the Native Americans to put lids on the animal feed troughs. I'm sure the cows had no trouble lifting the lids when they got hungry. And why are we just now finding out that the Indians were also cattlemen and ranchers in need of feed troughs for their cattle. I don't know why they bothered to hunt at all. I also was not aware that Indians used coffins to bury their dead. source
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In a 1994 article in the Wall Street Journal titled Snoopy at the Smithsonian, the author bemoaned what he called the "political makeover of the Smithsonian." The piece was prompted by Secretary I. Michael Heyman's recent approval of the National Air and Space Museum's proposed Enola Gay exhibit, which the author viewed as the latest example of how the Smithsonian seemed to be transforming its museums over recent years into "vehicles for political re-education." He wrote that this trend began during the tenure of Secretary Robert McCormick Adams, who started in 1984 and hired individuals from the "Academic Left." According to the author, the Board of Regents and the U.S. Congress had not been paying attention to what he saw as the intentional creation of exhibits that presented ideological views, rather than facts, to the general public. Under pressure, the Smithsonian made some revisions to the exhibit to moderate criticism of the effects of science on society. None of the parties, however, were ultimately happy with the outcome.

In summary, The American taxpayer is forking over nearly 100 million dollars a year to be lied to and deceived. They have some wonderfully artistic exhibits but pretty lies are still lies. I reluctantly share a bit of gossip from a former employee of the S.I. who tried to champion the idea of Diffusionism based on all the evidence that flowed to the Institute and was fired for his troubles. His claim is that the S.I. has loaded up a barge full of troublesome artifacts and dropped them in the Atlantic Ocean. This alarming tidbit may be sour grapes from a disgruntled and dismissed employee but, considering the documented evidence of artifacts they've lost (some to which they'll even admit losing), one has to consider the possibility that his accusation has merit.

What evidence have they received from their many donations that would warrant a cover-up of such history-altering proportions? I deliberately left out all the overwhelming evidence of the giant skeletons sent to the S.I. that no longer exist or are no longer available for viewing (unless you own a submarine) as it would require its own article.

National Institute of Science as well as the National Academy of Science were 1863 extensions by Congress of the Smithsonian Institution for the stated purpose to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art" when called upon by the government." Interesting choice of words for their charter: when called upon by the government. Is that to imply that we don't want you poking around just anywhere? The first Secretary of the NIS, Joseph Henry, soon became its 2nd President but was dismayed by and opposed to such an organization and disavowed the secretive negotiations that characterized its founding. Why would secret negotiations be needed to start a science museum? In 1863 there were nearly daily findings being reported in newspapers of giant skeletons and technological artifacts.

He spent 8 months in Europe touring their Science academies and museums only to return disgusted by what he saw, stating, "the charlatanism of our country struck me " more than ever before, and [that] he often thought of [his predecessor Alexander]Bache's remark "that we must put down quackery or quackery will put down science."

Henry was supposed to model our proposed National Institute of Science on the existing European ones which he thoroughly balked against stating, "I have never thought that the Conception of an Academy, borrowed from the Academies of Europe, namely, an institution supported by Government from the public Treasury, could be successful. It has always appeared to me to be incompatible with the spirit of our institutions."

Henry, being an honorable man, was opposed to relying on the government, ie-the public largesse, for funding postulating, that the academy could not rely on federal appropriations and that accepting government money to support its work might compromise its scientific objectivity. "Its existence," Henry wrote, "should in no-wise depend on the fitful appropriations of Congress, which would not fail to be defeated by the adverse report to some favored project of an influential member."

He championed for board elections based on a candidates scientific merit and not their social standing. And although he was opposed to the Institute in general, he was called upon to serve and taking his selection seriously, faithfully executed his duties for 10 years assisting the U.S. by providing science when needed such as offering suggestions on how to prevent counterfeiting of monies and improving fog and lighthouses.

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Meeting of the National Institute of Science​


As the government's first science adviser, he chastised Congress "meddling in scientific matters they didn't understand well before he came to Washington, DC to lead the Smithsonian. Henry remained skeptical of Washington insiders' ability to address scientific questions. In reference to an 1844 meeting to be held by the National Institute for the Promotion of Science, based in DC, Henry remarked that he did "not like the plan of uniting science and party politics," and called the organization a "host of Pseudo-Savants."

For a man of such integrity as Henry, it must have been disheartening in the extreme to see his final years trying to build something of credit to the U.S. and its scientific community be undermined by partisan politics. He expressed concern that the Smithsonian, once he was no longer in charge, "may fall, as the agricultural department and the Patent office have done under political sway and the director be changed with every change of administration." He also complained that "the discovery of new scientific principles . . . has been almost entirely neglected" in the US and in England. " Kind of makes you wonder where all those inventions of the industrial revolution came from.

Would that such men as Joseph Henry were still around to advance scientific discovery and keep special interest groups from clouding all issues. For having such noble beginnings as those envisioned by the benefactor James Smithson and the visionary President of the Institute, Joseph Henry, the Smithsonian has fallen very far from its charter: to advance and diffuse knowledge.
 
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KorbenDallas

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Fun stuff they were occupied with during the Civil War:
  • National Academy of Science were 1863 extensions by Congress of the Smithsonian Institution for the stated purpose to "investigate, examine, experiment, and report upon any subject of science or art" when called upon by the government.
  • In 1863 there were nearly daily findings being reported in newspapers of giant skeletons and technological artifacts.
Sorry, but I see the land which used to belong to the Giants. Adds an additional spin on the nature of the Civil War, doesn't it?

In my opinion, this is one of the most important threads on this forum. Smithsonian has been on the radar for a very long time already. To be honest, I did not know much about its structure till I read the OP. Very interesting it is.

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It's kind of weird to realize that there are specifically tasked individuals walking among us. Pretty sure Smithsonian employs tons of clueless people, but there gotta be a few who get the "job" done.

The phenomena of artifact disappearance (giants, and what not...) appears to exist. I find it hard to believe that there is no merit to all the so-called "rumors". Smithsonian has to have a specific procedure setup, to make sure that nothing slips by. Which means that some sort of archaeological reporting system has to be discretely implemented.

For me, the most memorable Smithsonian involvement was the Grand Canyon Ancient Egyptian artifact discovery of 1909. Of course they denied everything.

Note: Below Grand Canyon synopsis is being presented as an example of Smithsonian's alleged involvement, and subsequent cover up of the artifacts. If you want to discuss Ancient Egyptian Grand Canyon involvement in depth, please start a separate dedicated thread.

On April 5, 1909, a front page story in the Arizona Gazette reported on an archaeological expedition in the heart of the Grand Canyon funded by the Smithsonian Institute, which had resulted in the discovery of Egyptian artifacts. April 5 is close to April 1 – but then not quite… so perhaps the story could be true?
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read


Thank you very much for this well researched thread @whitewave.
 
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whitewave

whitewave

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The Smithsonian is such a large topic covering so many facets that I had to pare it down considerably for posting as a topic of discussion. The Grand Canyon caves have since their discovery been purchased by the government and cordoned off. No visitors/tourists/academicians are allowed and even park personnel are prohibited from the area. The government is serious about it too as it's protected by armed military personnel. Why can't we see what's going on in our own country without the threat of being shot?
 

asatiger1966

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The Smithsonian is such a large topic covering so many facets that I had to pare it down considerably for posting as a topic of discussion. The Grand Canyon caves have since their discovery been purchased by the government and cordoned off. No visitors/tourists/academicians are allowed and even park personnel are prohibited from the area. The government is serious about it too as it's protected by armed military personnel. Why can't we see what's going on in our own country without the threat of being shot?
That is not a threat.
Without getting into details tonight, some thought is required, my first combat unit had a Smithsonian Officer in our support platoon.
I never even thought about it. I met him through my platoon mentor. I had expressed an idea that maybe they would train on a 20mm anti aircraft weapon. Glass took me over to this Captain and ask if his family "still owned the ship"

I had no clue where this was going but the Captain said that his family owned a sailing ship that operated along the east coast of South America. Under contract with The Smithsonian Institute for marine studies. The ship was over 250 feet long, three mast, steel hull and diesel engines. Oh and least we forget, two 20mm AAA, one forward and one aft.

The Captain offered me a summer on board and yes I could fire the guns. A few months later they found what they were looking for and said goodby to my summer on a beautiful ship.

I do not remember the ship name but I went on line to see and found a similar ship, it seems smaller that my memory.

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whitewave

whitewave

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That is not a threat. Without getting into details tonight, some thought is required, my first combat unit had a Smithsonian Officer in our support platoon. I had no clue where this was going but the Captain said that his family owned a sailing ship that operated along the east coast of South America. Under contract with The Smithsonian Institute for marine studies. The Captain offered me a summer on board. A few months later they found what they were looking for and said goodby to my summer on a beautiful ship.
Curious as to why a combat unit would require a Smithsonian Officer in a support platoon. And before you mentioned it, I didn't know there was such a thing as Smithsonian officers (for combat units). I envisioned them all as stuffy, bespeckled, dusty academicians. Why were you offered a summer onboard the ship? In what capacity, if I may ask? What was the ship looking for that required a gunboat? Was it a Smithsonian "recovery" mission or a combat mission with a professorial type Smithsonian guy on as a courtesy? Interesting story but needs way more details. If encroaching into forbidden areas is not a threat, is it a promise? Wonder if that's where all those missing hikers are disappearing? Thanks for sharing your experience with us.
 

asatiger1966

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Curious as to why a combat unit would require a Smithsonian Officer in a support platoon. And before you mentioned it, I didn't know there was such a thing as Smithsonian officers (for combat units). I envisioned them all as stuffy, bespeckled, dusty academicians. Why were you offered a summer onboard the ship? In what capacity, if I may ask? What was the ship looking for that required a gunboat? Was it a Smithsonian "recovery" mission or a combat mission with a professorial type Smithsonian guy on as a courtesy? Interesting story but needs way more details. If encroaching into forbidden areas is not a threat, is it a promise? Wonder if that's where all those missing hikers are disappearing? Thanks for sharing your experience with us.
I will attempt to clarify some of your questions. explaining the "unit" might confuse anyone not somewhat exposed to Army combat forces.
My first posting after my training was to the 101st Airborne Division, 1/327 Airborne Battalion, HQ & HQ Company, Heavy Weapons Platoon, attached to HQ&HQ Company, LRRP Platoon as a RTO/FO short version. I carried a PRC-25 with range extensions for a 1st Lieutenant that was a forward observer. Both the Lieutenant and I were from the Heavy Weapons Platoon.

First I was nothing special, just happen to draw this unit because of my scouting skill set learnt while growing up in the Ozarks. My whole family was Military, police, CIA. Back in the 60's boys still believed in adventure, we all wanted to become Soldiers of Fortune. Sounds corny now. College was the family plan to become an officer but I wanted up front and most of the family officers jobs were boring. Qualified for OCS at the induction Center instead enlisting on condition of getting the paratroops and recon. The dog chases a car and catches it What now?

The platoon were going to try and talk about is the most heavily classified platoon in Army history. For real. The platoon was created in December of 1965 in Phag Rang Vietnam. I arrived in January 1966. The Commanding Officer was Major David Hackworth. The platoon consisted of a strange cadre, Navy UDT, French Foreign Legion, British SAS, Jordanian ,Portuguese commandos. Two men that had fought at Bastone. there were numerous MIT grads with masters degrees in math. They were fascinating they would lay awake, at night, in the jungle and play chess on an imaginary board. This was just your run of the mill recon platoon LoL .

The "Captain" that said his family owned the ship, was Navel Intelligence. A Captain in the Army is an 0-3 in rank as shown by image below. That Naval rank with the same insignia is a Lieutenant. To not confuse everybody he was called a Captain. Again the phrase Smithsonian Captain was sort of his nickname because of the ship. I should have said Smithsonian connected officer.

My next posting was personal guard for the 101st, 1st Brigade Commander RVN, One Star General.

The platoon still exists but the original intent was completed in less than a year. The platoon in late 1967 was discredited with accusations of every war crime one can imagine. Who would be interested in a story from those men anyway.

I am sure that you have questions, so do I.

If your told by a government representative involved with the military that "they will kill you if", stop and do not cross go.

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whitewave, you ask good questions, you do realize how far back 1966-1970 is right. I remembered a few details that might fill in a few more blanks. The 101st Headquarters was located on the coast at Tuy Hoa. I was there once while serving with recon platoon. We worked in the mountains around Dac To, a provincial capital.

The mountains just north of Dac To, are some of the highest in the country. See map, I grew up spelunking in the Ozarks. There are caves everywhere and you see some really neat stuff down there, a boy thing. Are you aware that the largest cave in the world was located in Vietnam in 1991? Just about twenty miles north of the old DMZ. Those are low mountains compared to where we were.

The support "Heavy Weapons" platoon had two Chinese mercenaries, one Russian special forces and numerous " Montagnards" mountain tribesmen as scouts. The tribesmen had lived in the mountains for thousands of years and knew where all the neat stuff was. They were very protective of their Gods sacred dwelling places, usually on a mountain top. They had trouble grasping why we did not want to walk on the old khmer roads, they thought the gods walked them at night. The roads were wide 20-50 at some places and curved around the mountains, all the way to a point where you were looking at a blanket of fog or clouds. The mountains were all you could see and they looked like islands in the ocean.

To my experience there is no human agency involved with the park disappearances. Happy Thanks Giving.

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cambodia.jpg Khmer Empire.jpg
 
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whitewave

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Thanks asatiger. Don't want to get anyone in trouble for revealing secrets that will get them shot if told. Thanks for telling us what you can. I talked with a VietNam vet when I worked at the VA. He was part of the Tet Offensive and had PTSD from all the horrors he saw and secrets he had to keep. It was a slow night in the ER so we stayed outside and smoked and talked. After listening to some of his stories (tall tales they were) I thought "this guy is seriously delusional and has a persecution complex". When he was finally cleared medically to go up to the psych ward I escorted him there but forgot to get his chart. When I went back down to get the chart there was a HUGE file on this guy verifying everything he'd told me. His chart had a stamp across the front that instructed us to notify the DOD if he were ever admitted.

I think we're only as sick as the secrets we keep and exposing the secrecy of places like the Smithsonian (and especially their sister branch, The Natural History Museum where many of our artifacts drop into a black hole) is the only way to cure the madness/dystopian thinking that has permeated our culture. Thanks for your service and Happy Thanksgiving.
 

KorbenDallas

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They have a term for it :cool: Smithoniangate

And I think @whitewave would enjoy this YT Oklahoma comment, "My Grandfather worked on creating the Grand River Dam, at Disney, Oklahoma. When I was a child in the 50's, he used to talk about the Giant Graveyard they found as they were excavating the earth around the Dam. He said Scientists from the Smithsonian came, fenced off the area, put up big tents, the crowds couldn't see what they were doing. Grandfather said everyone in the area knew about the giant skeletons. Back then, Oklahoma hadn't been a State for very long and many of the people working on the Damn were Cherokee people because the area had been Cherokee Nation Reservation until oil was found. So, anyway... when the scientists were finished, they put everything in big crates and shipped them away. There isn't any record of these Giants or the Smithsonian Scientists in Disney, Oklahoma. anywhere. With the advent of the internet, we're all able to find out now that this sort of thing happened all over the USA.. and World. Yet, still.... the Smithsonian Institute remains quiet. We all pay taxes, we pay salaries, yet... so much is kept secret from us all. This is wrong in every way. We are not here to serve them, they are here to serve us!!!"
 
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whitewave

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One of the books I read recently about Giants in America (think that was actually the title) suggested that Oklahoma may have been a capital city for ancient civilizations in the USA area. He didn't give enough evidence to explain how he came to that conclusion but we have had some interesting finds here. Spiro Mounds (Spiro, Ok.), Viking runes (Heavener, Ok.), Cherokee reservation (Disney, Ok.), lots of really huge dinosaur remains (all over Ok.), possible portal (Beaver, Ok.).
 

asatiger1966

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Love you guys and girls, the comments made triggers my memories. While on R&R Christmas 1966 at Manila ,Philippines.
We were invited by the Philippines Embassy, we were staying at the Bayview Hotel across the street from our Embassy, to the American WW11 Cemetery, to honor our fellow paratroops sacrifice. Hang on we will get there. During WW11 a Filipino infantry regiment was surrounded on a flat plain and held little hope of not being annihilated by the Japaneses. An American paratroop unit had volunteered to reinforce the Filipinos, after jumping in they lost almost 100 % of their men. All survivors were captured.
We could not pay for a taxi, tips at dinner you name it the Filipinos were so appreciative they took us the next day to a movie set where a WW11 movie was being filmed.
While visiting the cemetery, the director said that this cemetery was the largest American Military cemetery anywhere. We asked if that included the USA mainland/ He said yes except for the one in Oklahoma. Our tour leader a Major Overbeck said that he was not familiar with that one. The director said that 70,000 Bronze Age soldiers from two armies were interred there. He named the location, all I remembered was it was near a river and one army had defended and the other overran there fortification. The Major asked who the combatants were and was told that no one knew. The one side had bronze weapons and one army had seashell necklaces and some sort of breastplates.. The officers were buried with some ceremony and the soldiers were in large graves both sides. Who won he did not know, who were they he did not know. In three days we were in Cambodia the conversation was forgotten.

I am uncomfortable with some issues, just habit. I have commented before that I have terminal cancer, 2-5 years depending on the numerous cocktails they are giving me. So reminiscing and if no one gets hurt might comment on one or two other items LOL.

Thanks for the memories
 
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asatiger1966

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#16
Thanks asatiger. Don't want to get anyone in trouble for revealing secrets that will get them shot if told. Thanks for telling us what you can. I talked with a VietNam vet when I worked at the VA. He was part of the Tet Offensive and had PTSD from all the horrors he saw and secrets he had to keep. It was a slow night in the ER so we stayed outside and smoked and talked. After listening to some of his stories (tall tales they were) I thought "this guy is seriously delusional and has a persecution complex". When he was finally cleared medically to go up to the psych ward I escorted him there but forgot to get his chart. When I went back down to get the chart there was a HUGE file on this guy verifying everything he'd told me. His chart had a stamp across the front that instructed us to notify the DOD if he were ever admitted.

I think we're only as sick as the secrets we keep and exposing the secrecy of places like the Smithsonian (and especially their sister branch, The Natural History Museum where many of our artifacts drop into a black hole) is the only way to cure the madness/dystopian thinking that has permeated our culture. Thanks for your service and Happy Thanksgiving.

Thanks for your service at the VA. There are so many ways to change history and maybe a study of our military would come in handy. We were debriefed at Fort Lenardrwood, Mo. That is another story. I go home, if you ever can, and in a few weeks drive over to the local VA in Dallas. All good till give my ID and ask about a plane ride on a MAC going to Europe. I got a runaround so I asked to see the chief administrator. No is a word I am not familiar with.

This dxxx said that he needed to have my 201 file looked by his man? OK , I end up in Dr. xx ,retired from Loma Linda University that could have been Sigmund Freud brother. A nut doctor, so I asked why he needed to look me over just to leave the country? He had my 201 file on his desk with his hand on it. He ask a few questions about my service, which I answered. Then I asked to look at my on damm file. He pushed the three inch file away and said you can not see this file, ever. Your file is marked Blue PI. no amount of lawyers or money will get you this file. Now what is blue PI?
 

Ice Nine

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#17
@asatiger1966, I'm glad you are here sharing with us, thank you for everything and I'm very sorry to hear you have cancer.

Some more about the Grand Canyon and the Goobermint.

In 1956 there was a major plane crash.
There was a thunderstorm over the Grand Canyon the morning that two airplanes vanished there the summer of 1956.
Investigators later determined that the TWA and United Airlines flights had collided in mid-air, some 21,000 feet above the canyon, killing all 128 people aboard both aircraft.
At the time, it was the deadliest accident in commercial aviation history, and it prompted a huge push for aviation safety that culminated in the creation of the Federal Aviation Administration. The crash response eventually led to the development of nationwide radar, collision avoidance systems, flight-data recorders, and sophisticated navigation tools.
Grand Canyon plane crash

But that's not the big story, there area of the crash sites has been put off limits forever. Because something was seen down there. I don't think there is any disputing the fact.

What this guy spotted is around 4:40
Lost flights
 
OP
OP
whitewave

whitewave

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#18
While visiting the cemetery, the director said that this cemetery was the largest American Military cemetery anywhere. We asked if that included the USA mainland/ He said yes except for the one in Oklahoma. Our tour leader a Major Overbeck said that he was not familiar with that one. The director said that 70,000 Bronze Age soldiers from two armies were interred there.
Well, that's news to me! Never heard of that one. Thanks for eating up the rest of my day searching for info on that. LOL. Never heard of blue PI either, not even on the guy I mentioned in my story. Wonder if it has anything to do with medical experimentation? They give you guys a LOT of injections and, really, you don't KNOW what's in those cocktails. My husband was disabled from the 40 year old, improperly-stored-in-a-Michigan-warehouse anthrax shots they gave him during Desert Storm. I begged him not to take the shots but they were dishonorably discharging vets for refusing the shots and he only had 3 years til retirement so he risked it.
 

BStankman

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#19
They give you guys a LOT of injections and, really, you don't KNOW what's in those cocktails. My husband was disabled from the 40 year old, improperly-stored-in-a-Michigan-warehouse anthrax shots they gave him during Desert Storm. I begged him not to take the shots but they were dishonorably discharging vets for refusing the shots and he only had 3 years til retirement so he risked it.
Good advice. Listen to all the nurses that tell you not to get vaccinated. And not the doctor that gets the bonus.

@asatiger1966, I'm glad you are here sharing with us, thank you for everything and I'm very sorry to hear you have cancer.
But that's not the big story, there area of the crash sites has been put off limits forever. Because something was seen down there. I don't think there is any disputing the fact.

What this guy spotted is around 4:40
Lost flights
Thanks for the link. Now I have to look for bullet holes in the wreckage and at all the background cliffs.
looks like a giant Eagle relief to me.

309867730_NEuFr-L.jpg
 
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Ice Nine

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#20
Good advice. Listen to all the nurses that tell you not to get vaccinated. And not the doctor that gets the bonus.
Thanks for the link. Now I have to look for bullet holes in the wreckage and at all the background cliffs.
looks like a giant Eagle relief to me.
View attachment 12935
I don't get vaccinations, none since the childhood ones. So at least 55 years or so. I don't recall ever getting any in my teens. Anyway, I rarely, if ever get sick.

I never gave a thought that the planes colliding was anything other than a tragic accident. Even though the Smithsonian has been covering up things, I think that the Giant Eagle or whateverthehell it is carved on the cliff face might have been news to everybody.

Yes, something else to put on my list, I'll be searching the rock faces of the Grand Canyon. That's one of my favorite things to check out anyway, the background of pictures. Sometimes there are more and/or better anomalies in the background. Case in point the above photo. I wish I had a way to make it look better enlarged, but no such luck.
 
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