19th century: Radium Heating Systems?

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An advertisement boasted that “one of its chief advantages is the fact that it requires no fuel. . . . the heating pad consists of a stamped steel receptacle filled with a substance which will attract itself heat rays and retain the heat attracted for several hours. The substance they used was radium. Radium was an intriguing new material to manufacturers, who found a spot for it in a number of products, even toothpaste! In the first years of...
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1854-59 ship: SS Great Eastern a.k.a. Leviathan

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SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steamship. Though christened Leviathan during an initial launching attempt in early November 1857, she was thereafter always known as Great Eastern. Nearly three month's costly struggle to get her afloat, and more problems while she was completing, left her original company bankrupt. New owners decided to employ her on the route between Britain and North America. However, insufficient capitalization...
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New York Armories: what were they?

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The $750,000 structure was completed in April 1887. Before the 12th Regiment moved in, a glittering reception was held on April 21. Unfortunately, the National Guard was better at fighting battles than at planning social events. Invitations went out to far more people than could be accommodated. The following day the New-York Tribune was irate at the outrageous turn of events. “The people who were asked to the 12th Regiment’s reception last...
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Seattle's Elmer H. Fisher: The Man, The Myth, The Legend...

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Like many other young architects of his generation, Fisher abandoned his practice in 1891 as the tide of reconstruction ebbed. He became the proprietor of the Abbott Hotel, but lost this and other real estate investments during the economic crash of 1893. Fisher’s attempts to reestablish his practice failed, both in Seattle and in Los Angeles. He died in 1905, an architectural draftsman and carpenter. The finale is pretty said. Elmer Fisher...
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What happened to the Siberian forests 200 years ago?

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I do not think that total, human infused deforestation of such a vast region was possible in the 19th, or early 20th century. Demographic data simply does not support it. As it was mentioned above, current population of Siberia is approximately 40 million people. You can reference Geography of Siberia to see that there were barely any people out there. Also, I think this issue of "200 year old trees" will encompass way more than just Russian...
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Mud Flood, Dirt Rain, and the story of the Buried Buildings

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Piranesi was creating his immortal art in the 18th century. The buildings I wanted to talk about, for the most part were constructed in the 19th. Yet, these building have clearly accumulated quite a few feet of the so-called "cultural layer". Some might say that those buildings settled down with time. The other explanation would be that these buildings were built this way.
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Annihilated African cities, killed population, establishment lies, Timgad and the Richat Structure Atlantis

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This thread is a sort of a buildup on the already existing thread: 400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa. Influenced by the recent publicity related to the ancient lost city of Atlantis being located in Africa, I took a hard look at quite a few of the older maps. Based on what I've seen, I did not see any evidence pointing to the African Atlantis being located on top of the Richat "Eye of Africa"...
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400 year old Sahara Desert, or why people forgot everything they knew about Africa

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Somehow, in the 16th, and 17th centuries the map makers forgot to update their maps with the wisdom of the scientists of the future. Instead they depicted the Sahara Desert the way it was back then, 400 - 450 years ago. And what a beautiful site it was: lakes, rivers, cities, people, animals. Everything but the Great Egyptian Pyramids, so to speak. And then, all over sudden people got dumber. Well, either dumber, or the Mankind suffered some...
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Bizarre transformation of the North American Continent: 16th through 19th centuries

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What if continents looked very close to the way they were depicted on the contemporary maps? Could something cause the water levels to rise? Just may be, the North American continent suffered a catastrophic event (along with the rest of the World). Map makers and Cartographers were desperately trying to reflect on the current state of things while the N. A. Continent was still changing its outline. In the 19th century the outline finally...
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