Dating Mud Flood, and why it couldn't have been recent within 150/200 years: New England stone walls

Magnus

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#1
There are 100,000s of miles of mortarless stacked stone walls all through Connecticut, NY state, Massachussets, Rhode Island, and much less in New Hampshire. Its a southern New England phenomena and into NY state.

I have many photos I have taken that show 90 degree angle turns in these walls, and where some of the stone walls were actually (built? Or converted) into pathways covered with soil, to create a raised road.

The sheer volume of work would take a few centuries at least.

Mudflood surely would have washed away amd destroyed many of these walls, if MudFlood was in the 1800s....
I Dont believe these walls all could have been built within 100-150 years, all thru the Northeast....

I will post more images and perhaps video later. For now just creating this thread to see what I can stimulate.

Anyone else ever visited/lived in the southern New England area and experienced these walls? They are actually the largest and longest stone structures in the world according to some.

Man-made? I wonder if perhaps Giants created them, as like a trail marker, it would be akin to men crudely stacking small stones/pebbles as a trail marker.
It would be insane amounts of labor for farmers and natives to build all these. They are not all for penning in sheep and cattle and farmland!!
Soo many of these walls traverse hills and steep gorges, run along the top of ridgelines, and have large trees growing right next to them, sometimes pushing stones over! Showing their original age.

The second image is a LIDAR image from above of an example of how many stone walls there are even in just a neighborhood of a part of a town.

images (10).jpeg images (11).jpeg images (12).jpeg
 

UnusualBean

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#2
The evidence seems to point to multiple events between 150 and 300 years ago. These events didn't happen everywhere, though, so it's possible that that specific area was spared, or that the builders had access to better technology than you're picturing they had.

Those walls are cool, though. I'd never heard of them before.
 
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Magnus

Magnus

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#3
The evidence seems to point to multiple events between 150 and 300 years ago. These events didn't happen everywhere, though, so it's possible that that specific area was spared, or that the builders had access to better technology than you're picturing they had.

Those walls are cool, though. I'd never heard of them before.
The thing is, New Haven CT and NYC are right in the heart of these stone wall areas.
There are absolutely ancient buildings in these areas, and churches/homes/edifices with mudflood evidence.

I need to investigate more
 

BStankman

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#4
These should be the 8th wonder of the world. But you cannot date granite.
The Geology of Colonial New England Stone Walls

If you have ever been to New England, the walls are everywhere but much less common in the large river valleys.

VT Windsor Connecticut River Valley.jpg
And are missing from much of 1700's artwork.
Did all the trees get burned in the 1816 year without summer?
Why 1816 Was the Year Without a Summer

Like they great wall of China, these are still getting built today.
For the people that still farm there, it is a spring tradition to clear the rocks from the fields and pasture.

HW1874P245589.jpg

Way too many strange things in New England.

fig 3.jpg

Gungywamp, Groton
Ashfield News Articles: The Mysterious Stone Chambers of New England and the Search for Lost America Part 1

Dighton-Rock.jpg

Who Made the Petroglyphs on the Mysterious Dighton Rock?


So many rocks, but the starfort is dirt?

c_fort_griswold.jpg

Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park — Friends of Fort Griswold
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park
 
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Magnus

Magnus

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#5
These should be the 8th wonder of the world. But you cannot date granite.
The Geology of Colonial New England Stone Walls

If you have ever been to New England, the walls are everywhere but much less common in the large river valleys.
View attachment 11274
And are missing from much of 1700's artwork.
Did all the trees get burned in the 1816 year without summer?
Why 1816 Was the Year Without a Summer

Like they great wall of China, these are still getting built today.
For the people that still farm there, it is a spring tradition to clear the rocks from the fields and pasture.
View attachment 11275

Way too many strange things in New England.
View attachment 11276
Gungywamp, Groton
Ashfield News Articles: The Mysterious Stone Chambers of New England and the Search for Lost America Part 1

View attachment 11278
Who Made the Petroglyphs on the Mysterious Dighton Rock?


So many rocks, but the starfort is dirt?
View attachment 11277
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park — Friends of Fort Griswold
Fort Griswold Battlefield State Park

Awesome post! Except its not really an annual tradition so much anymore... not enough to build new walls. But perhaps add a dozen or so medium size stones per half acre plowed.

I have some tilling experience, gardening in S.W. CT. Of course my experience is anecdotal. But I dont believe each spring there are thousands of new stones being tilled up (tillers rarely go below 16 inches deep) at every farm in New England.

These first three images I have taken myself. They show 90 degree angles of walls. The first is the front yard of a home in Fairfield County, often called in the past "walls of affluence" because nicer homes featured a natural stone wall fence (as compared to wooden picket or no fence)

The second two images are a 90 degree angle turn in a stone wall I found out in the wilderness, near to where a former mine is located in Fairfield county, CT

Another stone wall I photographed: note the tree growing so close. There are trees I have seen growing through stone walls that are close to 100 years old or more, massive thick trunks and 80 feet tall.

Next pic: it is common to find these round holes with seemingly no purpose out in the woods. The "official" story is they were drilled by miners to insert dynamite (and yea that makes no sense ofc)

BONUS:

check out this carved Turtle I discovered somewhere in Connecticut!

Magnus_1.jpg Magnus_2.jpg Magnus_3.jpg Magnus_4.jpg Magnus_5.jpg Magnus_6.jpg Magnus_7.jpg Magnus_8.jpg Magnus_9.jpg
 
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Ice Nine

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#6
Well for corn sakes if you put the dynamite in the hole, then that would be blown up and non existent. Sheesh! good one Quackedemia.

Magus, that Turtle is astounding.

Bouncing around in my brain are thoughts of all the copper mining that went on here in ancient times, but that was around the great lakes area.

But perhaps somebody was mining bismuth.

Bismuth was also known to the Incas and used (along with the usual copper and tin) in a special bronze alloy for knives.[16]

Wackipedia about bismuth

There was a family mining lead, silver and native bismuth, along with other minerals, in Connecticut, in the early 1800's, did they just find ancient mines? Anyway another piece of the puzzle, maybe.

Mining in Connecticut
 
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Magnus

Magnus

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#7

Regarding Fort Griswold, it was the site of a massacre and defeat of what we are told are early American revolutionaries and British.

The Captain in charge of the fort surrendered to the British and was summarily killed with his own sword.

Those earthworks could be later additions or a result of mudflood. Underneath are many unmortared rock walls and tunnels. It seems a much cruder starfort than the one just a few metres away, called Fort Trumbull
 

Apollyon

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#10
There were definitely actual mud floods, so I don't think it's a misnomer, just maybe that it doesn't capture the full picture.
We see small localized mud flows and even those obliterate pretty much everything in their wake. They would also tend to settle more prominently in the low laying areas and leave high areas alone which we don't see.
 

BStankman

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#11
Wow, that turtle. Amazing.
According to Native American legends and myths of the Eastern Woodland tribes the turtle played a part in their Creation myth. The Earth Diver turtle swam to the bottom of the water that stretched across the world. He surfaced with the mud which the creator used to make the earth.

Mining.
Old Newgate Prison - Wikipedia
Old Newgate Prison is a former prison and mine site on Newgate Road in East Granby, Connecticut. It is now operated by the state of Connecticut as the Old New-Gate Prison & Copper Mine Archaeological Preserve. The site includes a colonial-era copper mine, and the remains of the state's first official prison, which was used between 1776 and 1782 to house prisoners of war from the American Revolutionary War.

PostcardGranbyCTOldNewgatePrison1907.jpg

Seen that type of architecture before in Nevada.
They left their mark here.

new gate.jpg

More on the walls.
New England Is Crisscrossed With Thousands of Miles of Stone Walls

estimates that there are more than 100,000 miles of old, disused stone walls out there, or enough to circle the globe four times.

estimates, there were around 240,000 miles of them in New England. That amounts to roughly 400 million tons of stone, or enough to build the Great Pyramid of Giza—more than 60 times over.
 
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Ice Nine

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#12
Nice find BStankman, more copper mines.

I can verify the Fort Griswold information. At Least in regards to who was fighting who.
I had 4 cousins fighting at Fort Griswold, they all survived, even one of them who received 7 bayonet stabs, his heart could be seen beating in his chest. He was one of the very few wounded who survived. I was so surprised when a link to Fort Griswold showed up here. Thanks @Magnus
 
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#13
I live in North Eastern Connecticut and spend countless hours walking in the woods and have often wondered how much man power it took to construct these walls and the narrative of farmers clearing rocks when plowing their fields is hard to accept. Also at a time when we did not have machinery to move these stones and some are quite large to consider using just animals to pull them around.
Awesome post! Except its not really an annual tradition so much anymore... not enough to build new walls. But perhaps add a dozen or so medium size stones per half acre plowed.

I have some tilling experience, gardening in S.W. CT. Of course my experience is anecdotal. But I dont believe each spring there are thousands of new stones being tilled up (tillers rarely go below 16 inches deep) at every farm in New England.

These first three images I have taken myself. They show 90 degree angles of walls. The first is the front yard of a home in Fairfield County, often called in the past "walls of affluence" because nicer homes featured a natural stone wall fence (as compared to wooden picket or no fence)

The second two images are a 90 degree angle turn in a stone wall I found out in the wilderness, near to where a former mine is located in Fairfield county, CT

Another stone wall I photographed: note the tree growing so close. There are trees I have seen growing through stone walls that are close to 100 years old or more, massive thick trunks and 80 feet tall.

Next pic: it is common to find these round holes with seemingly no purpose out in the woods. The "official" story is they were drilled by miners to insert dynamite (and yea that makes no sense ofc)

BONUS:

check out this carved Turtle I discovered somewhere in Connecticut!
Was the turtle carved or is it something that has petrified into rock?
 
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BStankman

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#14
I live in North Eastern Connecticut and spend countless hours walking in the woods and have often wondered how much man power it took to construct these walls and the narrative of farmers clearing rocks when plowing their fields is hard to accept. Also at a time when we did not have machinery to move these stones and some are quite large to consider using just animals to pull them around.

Was the turtle carved or is it something that has petrified into rock?
Doubt it was carved by nomadic savages that used stone tomahawks.
Egyptologist, carve us a vase: stoneworking tools and methods

When the academics find it, they will declare it an 1800 hoax and bury it somewhere.

Turtle rock in Mongolia.
mongolia-karakorum-turtle-rock.jpg

Toad rock New Boston.
postcard.jpg

@Magnus
This guy see snakes, turtles and more animal effigy in all the walls. Your photo would probably be his holy grail.
just the KW NM Turtle.jpg
Waking Up on Turtle Island

Any idea what these are? Not common, but not rare. Mohegan say they are for the little people.
Capture.JPG
 
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OP
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Magnus

Magnus

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#16
I'd say the latter. Yet another for the "mudfossil university" lol.

Great find.
Its absolutely carved, I touched it and examined it with my own hands and eyes.

This is not a mudfossil. Uh, wouldnt a turtle swim away or get flipped over by a mud flood? Not stay perched on a stone amd become petrified in situ, with its head, legs, tail all sticking out of its protective shell.

Mudfossils have a place for certain, but this is 100% carved
 
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#17
Its absolutely carved, I touched it and examined it with my own hands and eyes.

This is not a mudfossil.

Mudfossils have a place for certain, but this is 100% carved
Could well be. Impossible to know without proper examination. It just looked "molded" to the rock if you know what I mean. Obviously I can't see it in person and take samples lol, but is its right foot embedded in the rock or not? Is the rock that it is perched on carved or not? It's just clues like that that I like to look for.
https://www.stolenhistory.org/attachments/magnus_8-jpg.11358/

Uh, wouldnt a turtle swim away or get flipped over by a mud flood? Not stay perched on a stone amd become petrified in situ, with its head, legs, tail all sticking out of its protective shell.
Unless petrification and death was instant.
 

Onthebit

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#18
Could well be. Impossible to know without proper examination. It just looked "molded" to the rock if you know what I mean. Obviously I can't see it in person and take samples lol, but is its right foot embedded in the rock or not? Is the rock that it is perched on carved or not? It's just clues like that that I like to look for.
https://www.stolenhistory.org/attachments/magnus_8-jpg.11358/



Unless petrification and death was instant.
suffocated in mud maybe.
 

Ice Nine

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#20
There's a great video on petrification somewhere. Let's see. Here it is:

Hey that was outstanding and very enlightening. I haven't paid enough attention to the EU, I can see that now. Electrical petrification makes sense to me and you can't dispute the petrified tree that got transmuted via the high voltage electrical charge of the broken power line. I also put much stock in all myths and legends.

Thank you for posting that video.
 
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