The great Tartar wall in China

KorbenDallas

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#1
Just wanted to share these few images and see what you think about this Chinese Tartar wall. I have never heard of it. Have you? I’m wondering if this could be a coverup story for the actual great wall of China.

Unfortunately I don’t have time to do a proper research at the moment.

D417BC41-016B-465E-8FA5-50DD78A07030.jpeg 1075B56C-7337-4D50-8B3F-8DEB24752C5B.jpeg 0D970391-FD9C-4D27-B693-4A4E6E0E78A2.jpeg CB4BC288-9F32-41CB-A7E8-2E23B691C695.jpeg FA771D84-1167-4670-A27E-51076E5BF8C7.jpeg 83DC2502-D5B3-48BF-9BF0-5F63AFEC3818.jpeg
 

dreamtime

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#2
mapDongBianMen.jpg

The Tartar Wall sourrounds the Inner City of Beijing. Originally in the 16th Century it had been the Mongol City of Dadu; it was in the form of a square with the walls having a perimeter of nearly 15 miles.

Below, there is a map of the central part of Beijing drawn by British cartographers in 1927. The areas in blue are outside the city walls. The various temples have been highlighted with yellow. The Temple of Earth (Ditan) in the north, the Temple of the Sun in the east, and the Temple of the Moon in the west are all outside the city walls. The Temple of Heaven (Tian Tan) and the Temple of Agriculture are both within the city walls in the south section of the city. At the time that the map was drawn, the Republic of China had been founded and the Qing Dynasty had ended. The cartographer indicated the Qing Dynasty names for the sections of the city. The upper brown section was called the Tartar City because only the Manchus, the rulers of China during the Qing Dynasty, were allowed to live there. The lower part of the brown section was known as the Outer City. Chinese were allowed to live there and build their business, most of which were necessary to the running of the imperial households.
http://hua.umf.maine.edu/China/HistoricBeijing/History/pages/177_BeijingCityWall.html

I think back then China was basically a part of the Tartar landscape in Asia, i.e. Chinese Tartary.

East Tartary and Maritime Tartary are old names for the Manchu-inhabited territory extending from the confluence of the River Amur with the River Ussuri to Sakhalin Island. This area is now the Primorsky Krai with Vladivostok as regional administrative center.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartary
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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#3
I think on this one we will have to dig a bit deeper than colleges and wikipedia. Anything Mongol probably derives from Moguls with their great Mogul at the helm. For they share the same territories.

37D34528-6628-4A80-A82B-5D2B320F5E61.jpeg

And Tartaria only became a region after they wiped clean its imperial history. They tried hard to make Tartaria sound like some region ie Siberia, or Sahara. They almost succeeded too.
 

whitewave

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#5
I think those are trees growing behind the wall but what do I know?
 

BStankman

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#6
Not much to add here except this building is amazing.
220px-Tower_on_Tartar_Wall.jpg

Not too common to have a rail road next to a palace. We usually put those in the poor part of town.
 

whitewave

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#7
It would make hauling the bricks to the building site easier but IS that a train? I don't see any chimneys for a steam engine or any horses to draw the wagon. What IS the locomotive power of that thing?
 
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