1886: This crane was used to build the Tower of Babel

The crane in the middle is from 1563 painting of Pieter Bruegel the Elder - The Tower of Babylon. The one on the right was cut out from the 1551 painting by Pieter Pourbus called Portrait of Jan van Eyewerve.

The crane on the left I found very little info on. This is the only info I was able to get:
  • This photo of the crane at the Zoutwerf dates from 1886 and was posted on Flickr by Roger Kokken!
  • Look in the comments
crane_1-1.jpg

One more image of this 1886 crane which popped up in the image search. with no real info, unfortunately.

crane_1886.jpg


KD: This technology, allegedly, pertains to 1550s. To have this wooden crane alive and kicking in 1886 is, at the very least, bizarre. Are we talking about some technological stagnation, where this crane is (for example) 10 years old, or did it really survive for that long? There is another example of an immortal crane out there:
While the title of this article is obviously sarcastic, the stuff with time shenanigans is weird. Knowing what happened when has become a luxury we no longer appear to have.
 
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    Did you see this article, it's pretty cool.
    LOL, the narrative is so consistent with its BS.
    • It was primarily used during the Roman period and the Middle Ages in the building of castles and cathedrals.
    • During the High Middle Ages, the treadwheel crane was reintroduced on a large scale after the technology had fallen into disuse in western Europe with the demise of the Western Roman Empire.
    • The earliest reference to a treadwheel (magna rota) reappears in archival literature in France about 1225, followed by an illuminated depiction in a manuscript of probably also French origin dating to 1240.
    • In navigation, the earliest uses of harbor cranes are documented for Utrecht in 1244, Antwerp in 1263, Brugge in 1288 and Hamburg in 1291, while in England the treadwheel is not recorded before 1331.
    Wondering why we have one of these on the streets of Zoutwerf in 1886.
     

    AmusingMuse

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    insidecrane.JPG
    LOL, the narrative is so consistent with its BS.
    • It was primarily used during the Roman period and the Middle Ages in the building of castles and cathedrals.
    • During the High Middle Ages, the treadwheel crane was reintroduced on a large scale after the technology had fallen into disuse in western Europe with the demise of the Western Roman Empire.
    • The earliest reference to a treadwheel (magna rota) reappears in archival literature in France about 1225, followed by an illuminated depiction in a manuscript of probably also French origin dating to 1240.
    • In navigation, the earliest uses of harbor cranes are documented for Utrecht in 1244, Antwerp in 1263, Brugge in 1288 and Hamburg in 1291, while in England the treadwheel is not recorded before 1331.
    Wondering why we have one of these on the streets of Zoutwerf in 1886.
    Yeah, I'm finding too many things only used in the Roman period and the Middle Ages. People just had "technological amnesia" for a really long time, right?
     

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