ship

  1. KorbenDallas

    1862: Experimental Ironclad USS Keokuk

    1862 We all know that there were some pretty interesting ships participating in the US Civil War. The below panoramic view of the Charleston Harbor, published on 5/2/1863 can serve as a testament to that. First in line of the ironclads below is: USS Keokuk - 1862 Image Source Advance of...
  2. KorbenDallas

    1860s: Russian Ironclads including Monitors

    With as much time as I spent reading and researching things related to various iron hulled 19th century ships, running into these 1860s Russian Ironclads was a bit of a surprise. The history of the mentioned wiki page partially explained the reason I did not see this page prior to 07/31/2020...
  3. KorbenDallas

    19th Century Lightships: What was their Light Source?

    Lightships A lightvessel, or lightship, is a ship that acts as a lighthouse. They are used in waters that are too deep or otherwise unsuitable for lighthouse construction. Although some records exist of fire beacons being placed on ships in Roman times, the first modern lightvessel was off the...
  4. KorbenDallas

    Obelisks Plus: Cleopatra's Needle. Journey to London.

    NOTE: Even with the technology available in 2005, when Italy agreed to repatriate the Obelisk of Axum, it had to be cut into three pieces and flown in three trips to Ethiopia. The obelisk only weighed 160 tonnes. Axum Obelisk Reinstall In ancient Rome, the transportation of obelisks was not...
  5. KorbenDallas

    c. 1485 boat design by Leonardo da Vinci

    Not sure what this dude was reading back than, but too many weird things surrounding the same person do not make him a genius. If anything, they should make him a suspect. da Vinci Boat Design P.S. I do know that da Vinci had a whole bunch of other "ahead of its time" things designed. Please...
  6. KorbenDallas

    1910: Floating Church Ship

    Translated: In 1910 the first steamboat-church was built in honor of St. Nicholas. The church was built on an English ship dating from the mid-19th century and the project was financed by merchants from Astrakhan. The floating church was used for missionary works in the Volga. I'm wondering...
  7. KorbenDallas

    1868: Bermuda Floating Dry Dock

    1868 Floating Dry Dock By the 1860s the floating dock concept was known and proven but the growth in ship size demanded that what was needed for Bermuda would be the biggest such unit yet built. It was to take ships of up to 10000 tons – including Britain’s new ironclads – but its location in...
  8. KorbenDallas

    1874: USS Alarm - what was it?

    We do not have tremendously much information on this ship. There is some, but compared to other ships it appears to be lacking info. It sure does appear to be lacking photographs. USS Alarm - an experimental torpedo boat constructed at the New York Navy Yard - was launched on 13 November 1873...
  9. KorbenDallas

    1873: Russian Round Armored Ships of Admiral Popov

    In accordance with the 1856 Treaty of Paris, which formalized Russia's defeat in the Crimean War, Moscow was forbidden to deploy its fleet in the Black Sea. This did not fully suit the imperial government and by 1871 (the moment the agreement was denounced and Russia was given back its right to...
  10. KorbenDallas

    19th century Canal Trolley Boats

    This is an FYI type article, the contents of which I do find interesting nevertheless. May be at some point we will understand the 19th century infrastructure capabilities. As it stands we are left to marvel various technological innovations those people were able to come up with in between...
  11. KorbenDallas

    1880s-90s: Roller Ships

    The roller ship was an unconventional and unsuccessful ship design of the late nineteenth century, which attempted to propel itself by means of large wheels. To be honest, I am not even sure what these are. May be these ships are indeed ships. One way or the other, this is another "failure"...
  12. KorbenDallas

    1877: The Hemi-Plunger Ship by Monsieur Donato Tomassi

    Ran into this 1877 ship designed by a certain M. Donato Tomassi. It does not sound like this ship was ever made, but then again, do we really know? Here is a short description of this 19th century wonder. The Hemi-Plunger The novel form of vessel, to which the above odd name has been given by...
  13. KorbenDallas

    112 year old ship "Kommuna" is still in service

    As a testament to the levels of quality equipment which was mass produced in the past, I wanted to present to you this Russian submarine salvage ship Kommuna. Christened Volkhov in 1912, it was renamed in 1922 and ever since has been known as Kommuna. On November 17th, 2013 this ship celebrated...
  14. KorbenDallas

    1876: French Ironclad Redoutable - another example of Tartarian technology?

    This is a build up on my other related articles: 1854-59 ship: SS Great Eastern a.k.a. Leviathan Our civilization did not build Titanic, Olympic or Britannic. Theirs did. Was it the Tartarian one? The idea behind these series of articles is that if we can not explain what technology was used...
  15. KorbenDallas

    Our civilization did not build Titanic, Olympic or Britannic. Theirs did. Was it the Tartarian one?

    Once again, tackling a well known topic, I risk to sound ridiculous but hold your judgement till you have some material objections to make. Jumping ahead I will say, that the issue of "we did not build this ship" extends way beyond these three ships. In reality, this is one of those instances...
  16. KorbenDallas

    19th Century Noah's Arks: Whaleback Steamer Ships

    I don't know about you, but the below ships, made between 1887 to 1898 look like submarines. It starts to sound pretty ridiculous, when you put hundreds, and may be thousands of all of them ships, locomotives, bridges, destroyed and rebuilt buildings, and thousands of miles of the railroads...
  17. KorbenDallas

    1854-59 ship: SS Great Eastern a.k.a. Leviathan

    FYI: the rise of publishing by the eighteenth century led to the use of newspapers and cheap editions of popular books for cleansing. Lord Chesterfield, in a letter to his son in 1747, told of a man who purchased a common edition of Horace, of which he tore off gradually a couple of pages...
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