1812: Moscow Column that never happened. Allegedly...

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At the summit is placed the Russian eagle, grasping in his talons a globe and holding in his beak a serpent convoluted into a ring, the emblem of eternity, in the most obvious and common sense; yet, perhaps, at the same time allusive to the conquest of a foe, whose insidious and envenomed friend ship had nearly brought ruin upon the Russian nation. At the bottom of the pillar are placed the French eagles. This, no doubt, is their fit place...
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The PTB History Fabrication Tools

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Throughout time, the establishment had to deal with tons of inconvenient historical information. We have to give credit where credit is due. They did a great job making ends meet. Luckily for us, there were a few loose ones left. These loose ends are out there for everyone to see, and were not really concealable. The PTB did the only thing they could with those. They forced an altered understanding of such loose historical ends. Below are...
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What event turned Scythia into Tartary?

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Reportedly a descendant of one of the Three Magi, Prester John was a generous ruler and a virtuous man, presiding over a realm full of riches and strange creatures. His kingdom contained such marvels as the Fountain of Youth, and it even bordered the Earthly Paradise. Among his treasures was a mirror through which every province could be seen. There were no poor people, no dissensions, no vices in his dominions. The legend of Prester John...
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Ancient Coats of Arms

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Hierosme de Bara was born in Paris around 1540 and possibly died in Geneva around 1600. He was a glass painter, goldsmith and armorist. We know very little about this author and artist who is said to be Parisian, appears only in a few administrative documents and who, with a privilege of the king running over ten years, had several editions of his master book printed: The Coat of Arms, "which shows the manner in which the Ancients and Moderns...
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1390 or 1666: Book of Ballymote. Improperly dated by the PTB?

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The Book of Ballymote was written in 1390 or 1391 in or near the town of Ballymote for Tonnaltagh McDonagh, who was then in occupation of the castle. The chief compiler was Manus O'Duignan. The book is a compilation of older works, mostly loose manuscripts and valuable documents handed down from antiquity that came into possession of McDonagh. The first page of the work contains a drawing of Noah's Ark as conceived by the scribe. The Book of...
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Pompeiigate Scandal: Chronology Issues

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I'm a firm believer that TPTB could not come up with all the lies at the same time, hence, from time to time, they had to adjust their narrative package. But there were times when the PTB were satisfied with their current BS model. In this case we are talking about the 19th century. Here is what was published prior to all this "plaster cast" coverup.
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Novaya Zemlya: Russians Hiding the Remnants of the Old World?

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Novaya Zemlya is an archipelago in the Arctic Ocean in northern Russia and the extreme northeast of Europe. A total of 135 nuclear tests were performed in the atmosphere, under water and underground. The explosion of the most powerful hydrogen bomb in human history with a capacity of over 50 megatons at an altitude of 4.5 kilometers also occurred here. To date, nuclear tests on the archipelago are not carried out, but non-nuclear experiments...
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1899-1901: Boxer Rebellion. What are they hiding?

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The Boxer Rebellion was an anti-imperialist, anti-foreign, and anti-Christian uprising that took place in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty. It was initiated by the Militia United in Righteousness, known in English as the Boxers because many of their members had been practitioners of Chinese martial arts, also referred to in the west as Chinese Boxing. The uprising took place against a background that included...
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Leonardo Da Vinci and his Micro-Brushes

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Apparently, the paintings done by Leonardo da Vinci cannot be faked by no artist of today. No matter how talented the artists of today are, not a single one of them is able to create a painting of the same quality. I am not even talking about making a copy of Mona Lisa here. None of the today's masters are capable of applying paint in a manner allegedly done by Mr. da Vinci.
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Triumphal Arches, aka Ianuae Magicae: bridge portals between places, or regular structures?

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I have been looking at the Triumphal Arches for a very long time, for the Stargate movie kept on pushing this crazy idea of teleportation type travel. Just got done spot-watching the Warcraft with its Dark Portal, and decided to throw a few words together in reference to them Arches. Ones of the hardest puzzles to crack, they are. There is essentially no valuable information to be obtained via searching for "Triumphal Arch". Even the oldest...
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The Staff of Saint Bernardine of Siena

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Bernardino of Siena was an Italian priest and Franciscan missionary. He was a systematizer of Scholastic economics. His popular preaching made him famous during his own lifetime because it was frequently directed against sorcery, gambling, infanticide, witchcraft, sodomy (homosexual coitus), Jews, and usury. Bernardino was later canonised by the Catholic Church as a saint - where he is also referred to as “the Apostle of Italy” - for his...
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1680: pocket watches by Thomas Tompion

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Simple mathematics suggest that even if Tompion was making one pocket watch a day, it would have taken him over 13.5 years to produce this number. If we push it to 6 days per watch, with one day a week off, we end up with 95 years. I don't know about you, but it appears we are missing a lot of valuable information capable of explaining this 5000 number. Like may be somebody forgot to mention a factory producing Tompion designed watches.
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1590s: Fort Santiago and Intramuros in Manila, Philippines

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The first Spanish fort, a palisaded structure of logs and earth, was destroyed not long after establishment, when in 1574 the Chinese pirate Lin Feng (Limahong) launched an almost successful siege of Manila. The Spanish army repelled the attack, but the fort, in realization of its defects, was rebuilt in stone. The present fort, constructed using volcanic tuff, was built between 1589 and 1592. It was named after St. James the Moor-slayer...
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19th Century Noah's Arks: Whaleback Steamer Ships

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A whaleback was a type of cargo steamship of unusual design, with a hull that continuously curved above the waterline from vertical to horizontal. When fully loaded, only the rounded portion of the hull (the "whaleback" proper) could be seen above the waterline. With sides curved in towards the ends, it had a spoon bow and a very convex upper deck. It was formerly used on the Great Lakes of Canada and the United States, notably for carrying...
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Weather Vanes vs. Air Travel, and may be Flags

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In my opinion the Weather Vanes mounted on top of the older, or "ancient" buildings had practical, rather than decorative purposes. To be exact, it was to show the direction of the wind to the pilots of the ancient airships. I understand that it probably sounds way too bananas crazy for some. Yet, if there was a practical purpose for a Weather Vane mounted 150 feet above the ground level, that would be my answer.
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Sodom and Gomorrah are at the bottom of the Dead Sea

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We have 5 cities which were allegedly punished by God. According to the Torah, the kingdoms of Sodom and Gomorrah were allied with the cities of Admah, Zeboim, and Bela. These five cities, also known as the "cities of the plain", were situated on the Jordan River plain in the southern region of the land of Canaan. Divine judgment by God was passed upon Sodom and Gomorrah and two neighboring cities, which were completely consumed by fire and...
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North America: New Granada, New Mexico, Cibola...

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Why would we even have these Granada shenanigans? Did they not have enough other words to use, assuming that conquerors are to be credited with any original names in the New World? Whose word was "Mexico?" And what if this Granada confusion is caused by its direct relation to the Seven Lost Cities of Gold aka Seven Lost Cities of Cibola? I have never heard of these 9 Provinces of New Mexico. I've seen these names on various maps, but I have...
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1671 Aqueduct of Santa Fe in Nova Mexico

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After his arrival in the Aztec empire, Hernan Cortes discovered the economic and political importance of the Chapultepec aqueduct. He took advantage of the city's dependence on the aqueduct and blocked the fresh water supply, eventually destroying it. Shortly after the Spanish conquest, he set about dividing the land among the conquistadors. He wanted to take the forest of Chapultepec for himself, but Charles V, King of Spain, denied his...
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Similar style buildings are all over the world. Were they built by our civilization?

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Seeing these old buildings we rarely think about architectural work put into designing them. And obviously, there was no Computer-aided design programs back in the day. It was a drawing board, a pencil, and an eraser. We do not think about those builders of the old not having any building, and construction equipment of today. Granted, at some point, a railroad was introduced, and some of those buildings were constructed not far from a body of...
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1846: Tunnel Boring Machines, Frederick Beaumont, Second Industrial Revolution

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Could the Second Industrial Revolution (1850-1914) be the process of legitimizing multiple pre-existing technological achievements? If you know an Officer serving in the Military Corps of Engineers, ask that Officer to design a machine similar to the one presented in this thread. If that Officer says that he cannot, let him know that Officer Beaumont, who died in 1899 could, and apparently did.
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